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By changing the mouse model they use to study how the immune system responds to cancer, a team of researchers hopes to shift the focus for one form of cancer immunotherapy back to the standard approach - relying on antigen-presenting dendritic cells - and

Different Mouse Model Turns Attention Away From Macrophage Approach

September 1, 2015 | by University of Chicago Medical Center | Comments

By changing the mouse model they use to study how the immune system responds to cancer, a team of researchers hopes to shift the focus for one form of cancer immunotherapy back to the standard approach - relying on antigen-presenting dendritic cells - and away from the current upstart, macrophages.

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Study in Mice Suggests How Anesthesia May Fight Lung Infections

September 2, 2015 10:20 am | Comments

In use for more than a century, inhaled anesthetics like nitrous oxide and halothane have made modern surgery possible. Now, in experiments in mice, researchers have added to evidence that certain so-called “volatile” anesthetics may also possess powerful effects on the immune system that can combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung, including influenza and pneumonia.

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Body Fat Hormone Leptin Influences Runner's High

September 2, 2015 10:12 am | Comments

The euphoric feeling that gives runners a motivational boost in the middle of their workout is in part modulated by the satiety hormone leptin, a new study reports. Mice with reduced leptin signaling in the brain logged nearly twice as many miles on a running wheel compared with normal mice. The research suggests that falling leptin levels send a hunger signal to the brain's pleasure center to generate the rewarding effects of running.

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Male Seahorse and Human Pregnancies Remarkably Alike

September 2, 2015 10:04 am | Comments

Their pregnancies are carried by the males but, when it comes to breeding, seahorses have more in common with humans than previously thought, new research from the University of Sydney reveals.

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Gene Therapy Fully Restores Vision in Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

September 2, 2015 9:48 am | Comments

Mice lacking the protein retGC1, which is deficient in humans suffering Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1), a disorder that causes severe visual impairment beginning in infancy, received gene therapy to replace retGC1 and showed fully restored visual function that persisted for at least 6 months. The success of this approach strongly support clinical testing of a gene therapy targeted to the retinas of LCA1 patients.

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Triggering "Virus Alert" in Immune System Combats Cancer in Mouse Model

September 2, 2015 9:22 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

Researchers have found a way to trigger a type of immune system "virus alert," according to a new study published in Cell. These findings could help boost cancer patients' response to immunotherapy drugs, which are designed to limit cancer cells' ability to avoid detection by the immune system.

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Multiple System Atrophy, a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson’s disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

New Type of Prion May Cause, Transmit Neurodegeneration

September 1, 2015 11:19 am | by Nicholas Weiler, UC San Francisco | Comments

Multiple System Atrophy, a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson’s disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. The findings suggest new approaches to developing treatments, but also raise a potential concern for clinicians or scientists who come in contact with MSA tissue.

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Innovive Inc, a leader in disposable IVC rodent caging, has announced that Stephen Baker has joined the company as Vice President of Business Development.

Pfizer's Stephen Baker Joins Innovive

September 1, 2015 10:12 am | by Innovive Inc | Comments

Innovive Inc, a leader in disposable IVC rodent caging, has announced that Stephen Baker has joined the company as Vice President of Business Development.

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It’s like something out of a science-fiction movie — time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans.

Mechanisms of Embryonic Wound Repair Identified in Fruit Flies

August 31, 2015 2:23 pm | by University of Toronto | Comments

It’s like something out of a science-fiction movie — time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans.

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When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still   make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye   called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cell

Eye Circuit Has Built-In Delay to See Small Moving Objects

August 31, 2015 2:11 pm | Comments

When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cells do their job, and may bring scientists closer to understanding how complex circuits are formed throughout the nervous system.

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Researchers have for the first time created and used a nanoscale vehicle made of DNA to   deliver a CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells in both cell culture and an animal   model.

DNA Delivers Gene-Editing Tool Into Cells

August 31, 2015 1:58 pm | by North Carolina State University | Comments

Researchers have for the first time created and used a nanoscale vehicle made of DNA to deliver a CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells in both cell culture and an animal model.

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Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

Synthetic Tumor Environments Make Cancer Research More Realistic

August 31, 2015 1:44 pm | by Austin Keating, University of Illinois Urban-Champaign | Comments

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

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Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers.

Colorful Potatoes Suppress Cancer Growth in Mice

August 31, 2015 10:13 am | by Matt Swayne, Pennsylvania State University | Comments

Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers.

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Parkinson's Disease Brain Cells at Risk of Burnout, Like an Overheating Motor

August 28, 2015 10:34 am | Comments

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported.

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Glial Cells Use Lipids to Direct Neuron Organization in the Spinal Cord

August 28, 2015 10:13 am | Comments

Healing spinal cord damage is an incredibly difficult problem because neurons have to be reconnected in a precise fashion, and there are still many mysteries surrounding how this occurs. Now, scientists at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered that in addition to proteins, lipids are also necessary for guiding axons.

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Taconic Biosciences Funds Custom Vici Syndrome Mouse Model Development and Breeding

August 28, 2015 10:00 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Taconic Biosciences | Comments

Taconic Biociences has announced that it will fund the development and breeding of a custom mouse model to study Vici Syndrome. The company is donating the work as a Corporate Sponsor and Ultimate Technology Sponsor of the 2015 Rare Disease Science Challenge: Be HEARD. The winning project was submitted by Michael and Rachel Harris, whose 9 year old son David was diagnosed with Vici Syndrome in early 2015.

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