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It is common knowledge that the longer humans spend in space, the longer it takes them to regain muscle strength upon their return to earth. The biggest question is, why. With the help of Caenorhabditis elegans, one researcher hopes to find out.

Worms to Test Muscle Mass and Strength in Space

March 24, 2015 | by Texas Tech University | Comments

It is common knowledge that the longer humans spend in space, the longer it takes them to regain muscle strength upon their return to earth. The biggest question is: why? With the help of Caenorhabditis elegans, one researcher hopes to find out.

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Sugar Molecule Helps Tell Cancerous From Noncancerous Cells in Mice

March 27, 2015 10:37 am | Comments

Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells.

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Neural Networks Mapped in Sea Slugs

March 27, 2015 10:02 am | Comments

Scientists say our brains may not be as complicated as we once thought – and they’re using sea slugs to prove it.

Immunotherapy Reduces Memory Problems Associated with Alzheimer's Disease

March 27, 2015 9:46 am | Comments

A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has revealed that a single dose of an immunotherapy reverses memory problems in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Carbon Nanotube Fibers Treats Parkinson's in Rats

March 27, 2015 9:31 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

A new study from Rice University has demonstrated the capabilities of carbon nanotube fibers as electrodes that interact with the brain. These fibers could replace the larger electrodes used currently in devices for deep brain stimulation therapies in patients with Parkinson's or other neurological disorders.

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Gene Therapy Slows Vision Loss in Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

March 26, 2015 10:57 am | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | Comments

Researchers have developed an antioxidant gene therapy that slows cone-cell death and prolongs vision in mouse models of retinal degeneration. The Harvard Medical School research team hopes the work will one day lead to new treatment options for people with inherited progressive blindness, such as retinitis pigmentosa, as well as other diseases involving oxidative damage.

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Nanorobotic Agents Pass Through Blood-brain Barrier in Animal Model

March 26, 2015 10:34 am | Comments

Magnetic nanoparticles can open the blood-brain barrier and deliver molecules directly to the brain, according to a new study. This barrier runs inside almost all vessels in the brain and protects it from elements circulating in the blood that may be toxic to the brain. The research is important as currently 98% of therapeutic molecules are also unable to cross the blood-brain barrier.

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Congenital Heart Disease in Mice Caused by Mutations in 61 Genes

March 26, 2015 10:18 am | Comments

Fetal ultrasound exams on more than 87,000 mice that were exposed to chemicals that can induce random gene mutations enabled developmental biologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine to identify mutations associated with congenital heart disease in 61 genes, many not previously known to cause the disease.

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Stem Cells Crucial to Cranial Development Identified

March 26, 2015 9:59 am | by John Hobbs, University of Southern California | Comments

University of Southern California researchers have discovered which stem cells are responsible for the growth of craniofacial bones in mice — a finding that could have a profound impact on the understanding and treatment of a birth defect that can lead to an array of physical and intellectual disabilities in humans.

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Got a Question About Cleaning and Sanitation?

March 26, 2015 9:44 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

Does sanitation stump you? Have a cleaning conundrum? Don't ask your co-worker, ask an expert! ALN is launching a new online-only column featuring an industry expert answering your burning questions about cleaning and sanitation.

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Brain Tumor Cells Decimated by Mitochondrial "Smart Bomb"

March 25, 2015 11:09 am | Comments

An experimental drug that attacks brain tumor tissue by crippling the cells' energy source called the mitochondria has passed early tests in animal models and human tissue cultures, say Houston Methodist scientists.

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Pig Biobank Reduces Number of Animals Used in Research

March 25, 2015 10:58 am | by Alison Abbott, Nature | Comments

Thousands of tiny tissue and fluid samples now sit in the newly constructed Munich MIDY-PIG Biobank in Germany — the world’s first systematic repository of tissue from a large, genetically engineered, non-human animal. The biobank was formed as part of a growing movement to maximize the scientific benefits of every animal used in research.

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Learning Mechanism Identified in Zebrafish

March 25, 2015 10:20 am | Comments

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe the first set of genes important in learning in a zebrafish model in the journal Neuron this week. Over the last 20 years, zebrafish have become great models for studying development and disease, as well as an ideal model for studying vertebrate neuroscience and behavior.

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Opossum-based Antidote Treats Snake Bites in Mouse Study

March 25, 2015 10:05 am | Comments

Scientists have reported in a presentation that they have turned to the opossum to develop a promising new and inexpensive antidote for poisonous snake bites. They predict it could save thousands of lives worldwide without the side effects of current treatments.

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A new study sheds light on the handing over of genetic control from mother to offspring early in development. Learning how organisms manage this transition could help researchers understand larger questions about how embryos regulate cell division and dif

Letting Go of the Genetic Apron Strings

March 24, 2015 8:20 am | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton University | Comments

A new study sheds light on the handing over of genetic control from mother to offspring early in development. Learning how organisms manage this transition could help researchers understand larger questions about how embryos regulate cell division and differentiation into new types of cells.

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An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis in animal models, according to a new study.

Blood Pressure Drug Protects Against MS Symptoms in Mouse Models

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by Kevin Jiang, University of Chicago | Comments

An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis in animal models, according to a new study.

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