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Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse are so different from those in people. Building on years studi

Mouse Genome Similar and Very Different from Human Genome

November 20, 2014 | by NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute | Comments

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse are so different from those in people. Building on years studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes.

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Researchers have found that a growth factor can regenerate damaged peripheral   nerves without causing the growth of new blood vessels — making it a unique   candidate to treat nerve damage in areas of the body where the proliferation of   blood vessels w

Damaged Nerves Regenerated without Blood Vessel Growth

November 20, 2014 10:18 am | by Sharon Parmet, University of Illinois at Chicago | Comments

Researchers have found that a growth factor can regenerate damaged peripheral nerves without causing the growth of new blood vessels — making it a unique candidate to treat nerve damage in areas of the body where the proliferation of blood vessels would be a drawback. 

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By manipulating the circadian clocks of Siberian hamsters, scientists may have identified a brain structure that disrupts memory when circadian rhythms fall apart, as they often do in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Link between Memory Deficit and Misfiring Circadian Clock

November 20, 2014 8:04 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | Comments

By manipulating the circadian clocks of Siberian hamsters, scientists may have identified a brain structure that disrupts memory when circadian rhythms fall apart, as they often do in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

It all started in 2008. The goal: attract top investigators -- Ph.D.s, Ph.D. candidates, professors, and post grads — and fundamentally advance knowledge of cancer and other complex diseases. This is not a classroom building; it is a research facility.

Marsico Hall Brings Together Top Researchers and Best Medical Technology

November 19, 2014 12:27 pm | by Biomedical Research Imaging Center | Comments

It all started in 2008 at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine. The goal: attract top investigators -- Ph.D.s, Ph.D. candidates, professors, and post grads — and fundamentally advance knowledge of cancer and other complex diseases. This is not a classroom building; it is a research facility.

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Researchers have discovered how a previously unknown hormone serves as a messenger from fat cells to the liver and are investigating the potential of developing a new treatment for metabolic disorders.

Hormone Prohibits Metabolic Disorders in Mice

November 19, 2014 11:59 am | by University of Michigan | Comments

Researchers have discovered how a previously unknown hormone serves as a messenger from fat cells to the liver and are investigating the potential of developing a new treatment for metabolic disorders.              

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Scientists have identified a novel delivery platform by which an antisense molecule — akin to the mirror image of the microRNA — can be used to exploit a unique feature of the tumor microenvironment and thereby gain access to cancer cells.

microRNA Silenced to Target Tumors in Mouse Model

November 19, 2014 11:43 am | by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Comments

Scientists have identified a novel delivery platform by which an antisense molecule — akin to the mirror image of the microRNA — can be used to exploit a unique feature of the tumor microenvironment and thereby gain access to cancer cells.   

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A team of scientists have found that a particular set of cells in a small region of the brain are responsible for memory problems after sleep loss. By selectively increasing levels of a signaling molecule in these cells, the researchers prevented mice fro

Memory Problems Caused by Sleep Deprivation Prevented in Mice

November 19, 2014 11:26 am | by University of Pennsyvania | Comments

A team of scientists have found that a particular set of cells in a small region of the brain are responsible for memory problems after sleep loss. By selectively increasing levels of a signaling molecule in these cells, the researchers prevented mice from having memory deficits.

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Scientists from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) in Japan have developed an advanced imaging system to identify cells responsible for storing memory within a tiny worm. Their study not only offers a new way to ide

Brain Cells Responsible for Memory Mapped in Worms

November 19, 2014 10:53 am | by Kyoto University | Comments

Scientists from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) in Japan have developed an advanced imaging system to identify cells responsible for storing memory within a tiny worm. Their study not only offers a new way to identify molecular substrates of memory but may also one day lead to understanding how memory loss occurs in humans.

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Diabetes Treatment Lights Up Blood Vessels

November 18, 2014 11:09 am | Comments

A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine has discovered a receptor on blood vessels that causes the vessel to relax in response to light, making it potentially useful in treating vascular diseases. In addition, researchers discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which blood vessel function is regulated through light of a specific wavelength.

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First Animal Model Developed for Deadly Brain Infection

November 18, 2014 10:56 am | Comments

Researchers have developed new insight into a rare but deadly brain infection, called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This disease – which is caused by the JC virus – is most frequently found in people with suppressed immune systems and, until now, scientists have had no effective way to study it or test new treatments.

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Low-calorie Diet Slows Aging

November 18, 2014 10:31 am | Comments

In a presentation prepared for the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, D.C., researchers say their experimental results, conducted in female mice, suggest how diets with fewer calories derived from carbohydrates likely deter some aspects of aging and chronic diseases in mammals, including humans.

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Common Antimicrobial Increases Cancer Risk in Lab Mice

November 18, 2014 10:19 am | Comments

Long-term exposure to triclosan, an antimicrobial agent commonly found in a broad array of soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and other consumer products, may have potentially serious health consequences. Data from a new study shows that triclosan causes liver fibrosis and cancer in laboratory mice through molecular mechanisms that are also relevant for humans.

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Repeat Head Injuries Interfere with Brain Repair System

November 17, 2014 4:51 pm | by Emily Caldwell | Comments

The brain’s ability to use energy is critical after an injury. In animal studies, Ohio State University scientists have shown that brain cells ramp up their energy use six days after a concussion to recover from the damage. If a second injury occurs before that surge of energy use starts, the brain loses its best chance to recover.

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Potential Treatment Approach for Lymphomas Triggers Severe Inflammation

November 17, 2014 11:32 am | Comments

The Malt1 protein is one of the most important control centers in human immune cells and a real all-rounder. Genetic defects in it can lead to the development of lymphatic cancer. A possible therapeutic approach is therefore to specifically block certain functions of Malt1, thus destroying the cancer cells. Now, however, scientists have shown in a mouse model that such a blockade can cause serious side effects.

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Consortium Uses Animal Models to Investigate Rare Diseases

November 17, 2014 11:19 am | Comments

What do a mouse, a fly, a zebrafish, a worm, and yeast have in common? Together these five organisms hold the keys for scientists to better understand the basic molecular function of genes and specific gene mutations. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research has awarded the Canadian Rare Diseases Models and Mechanisms Network $2.3 million to investigate these molecular mechanisms and advance rare disease research.

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Cannabis Compound Could Prevent Tumor Growth

November 17, 2014 10:47 am | Comments

Experts have shown that when certain parts of cannabis are used to treat cancer tumours alongside radiotherapy treatment the growths can virtually disappear.                

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