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For years, researchers have investigated the reasons for problkems with wound healing in diabetics. While many factors contribue, the specific molecular events have remained unclear, and there are few therapies available to treat these stubborn wounds.

Molecule Impairs Wound Healing in Diabetics

January 30, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

For years, researchers have investigated the reasons for problkems with wound healing in diabetics. While many factors contribue, the specific molecular events have remained unclear, and there are few therapies available to treat these stubborn wounds.

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Starting from human skin cells, researchers have created human insulin-producing   cells that respond to glucose and correct blood-sugar levels in diabetic mice. The   findings may represent a first step toward developing patient-specific cell   replaceme

New Cells Help Treat Diabetes in Mice

January 30, 2015 12:39 pm | by Jennifer Brown, University of Iowa | Comments

Starting from human skin cells, researchers have created human insulin-producing cells that respond to glucose and correct blood-sugar levels in diabetic mice. The findings may represent a first step toward developing patient-specific cell replacement therapy for type 1 diabetes.

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Got a Question About Cleaning and Sanitation?

January 29, 2015 11:28 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

Does sanitation stump you? Have a cleaning conundrum? Don't ask your co-worker, ask an expert! ALN is launching a new online-only column featuring an industry expert answering your burning questions about cleaning and sanitation.

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People bitten by a rabid animal have only a very brief window of time to seek medical attention before the virus takes hold in the central nervous system, at which point, the disease is nearly always fatal. A new study has successfully tested a treatment

Mouse Study Discovers Possible Rabies Treatment

January 29, 2015 8:22 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

People bitten by a rabid animal have only a very brief window of time to seek medical attention before the virus takes hold in the central nervous system, at which point, the disease is nearly always fatal. A new study has successfully tested a treatment on mice that cures the disease, even after it has spread to the brain.

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Researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss.

Stem Cells Grow New Hair on Mice

January 29, 2015 8:21 am | by Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute | Comments

Researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss.                   

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Researchers have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose

Stomach Acid-powered Micromotors Get First Test in a Living Animal

January 29, 2015 8:21 am | by UC San Diego | Comments

Researchers have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors.

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Studies show mice that receive a supplement of the “appetite hormone” ghrelin increase their sexual activity. Whether the hormone has the same impact on humans is unknown - but if it does, the researchers may have found the key to future treatments for se

Hormone Increases Sex Drive of Mice

January 29, 2015 8:20 am | by University of Gothenburg | Comments

Studies show mice that receive a supplement of the “appetite hormone” ghrelin increase their sexual activity. Whether the hormone has the same impact on humans is unknown - but if it does, the researchers may have found the key to future treatments for sex abuse.

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Scientists have identified a circuit in the brains of mice that regulates thirst. When a subset of cells in the circuit is switched on, mice immediately begin drinking water, even if they are fully hydrated. A second set of cells suppresses the urge to dr

Brain Circuit Regulates Thirst in Mice

January 29, 2015 8:19 am | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Comments

Scientists have identified a circuit in the brains of mice that regulates thirst. When a subset of cells in the circuit is switched on, mice immediately begin drinking water, even if they are fully hydrated. A second set of cells suppresses the urge to drink.

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In the battle against ovarian cancer, researchers have created the first mouse model   of the worst form of the disease and found a potential route to better treatments   and much-needed diagnostic screens.

Two Genes Trigger Severest Form of Ovarian Cancer in Mouse Model

January 29, 2015 8:18 am | by UNC Health Care | Comments

In the battle against ovarian cancer, researchers have created the first mouse model of the worst form of the disease and found a potential route to better treatments and much-needed diagnostic screens.             

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A number of therapies are available to help drug users quit, but addiction is extremely tough to beat. Scientists are working on vaccines to neutralize the high-inducing effects of recreational drugs, like cocaine. A new study has hit upon an approach tha

Vaccine Dulls Cocaine's Effects in Mice

January 28, 2015 8:28 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

A number of therapies are available to help drug users quit, but addiction is extremely tough to beat. Scientists are working on vaccines to neutralize the high-inducing effects of recreational drugs, like cocaine. A new study has hit upon an approach that might annul cocaine's additive buzz.

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Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy t

Protein-based Therapy Shows Promise against Resistant Leukemia

January 28, 2015 8:27 am | by Children’s Hospital Los Angeles | Comments

Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy they believe will prove highly effective against drug-resistant leukemia cells.

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A study shows that decreasing the number of A2A adenosine receptors in a particular type of brain cells called astrocytes improved memory in healthy mice. What’s more, reducing receptor levels also prevented memory impairments in a mouse model of Alzheime

Support Cells in the Brain Offer a New Strategy to Boost Memory

January 28, 2015 8:26 am | by Gladstone Institutes | Comments

A study shows that decreasing the number of A2A adenosine receptors in a particular type of brain cells called astrocytes improved memory in healthy mice. What’s more, reducing receptor levels also prevented memory impairments in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). Their precise molecular cause has never been determined. Now, cardiovascular scientists have stu

Possible Target for Common, But Mysterious Brain Blood Vessel Disorder Revealed in Mice

January 28, 2015 8:26 am | by Penn Medicine | Comments

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). Their precise molecular cause has never been determined. Now, cardiovascular scientists have studied this pathway in heart development to discover an important set of molecular signals, triggered by CCM-linked gene defects, that potentially could be targeted to treat the disorder.

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Use of the same antiangiogenesis drugs that have improved treatment of some cancers could also help surmount persistent difficulties in treating tuberculosis.

Antiangiogenesis Drugs Could Make Major Improvement in Tuberculosis Treatment

January 28, 2015 8:25 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | Comments

Use of the same antiangiogenesis drugs that have improved treatment of some cancers could also help surmount persistent difficulties in treating tuberculosis.                          

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Researchers Link Protein to Drug Allergies in Mice

January 26, 2015 11:29 am | by Brandon Levy | Comments

Immune cells known as mast cells play a primary role in allergic reactions. Mast cells are activated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and release inflammatory chemicals like histamine. Some compounds, however, can activate mast cells without interacting with IgE antibodies, triggering a so-called “pseudo-allergic” reaction. These substances, known as basic secretagogues, include many drugs that can cause allergic reactions.

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Stress During Pregnancy Can Affect Fetal Development

January 26, 2015 11:11 am | Comments

Stress hormones in the mother can affect fetal development, according to a study published in The Journal of Physiology. Researchers found that increased levels of glucocorticoid stress hormones in pregnant mice caused the mother to eat more but reduced the ability of the placenta to transport glucose to her fetus.

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