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New findings in mice indicate that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. The same vicious cycle of itching and scratching is thought to occur in humans, and the research provides new clues that may help br

Serotonin Release Causes Mice to Scratch More

October 31, 2014 | by Jim Dryden, Washington Univ. in St. Louis | Comments

New findings in mice indicate that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. The same vicious cycle of itching and scratching is thought to occur in humans, and the research provides new clues that may help break that cycle, particularly in people who experience chronic itching. 

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Researchers say that by using nanotechnology, they have improved how a peptide can be delivered to the diseased heart tissue of mice.

Heart-therapy Researchers Develop Nanobullet Drug Delivery System

October 31, 2014 12:05 pm | by Tracie White, Stanford School of Medicine | Comments

Researchers say that by using nanotechnology, they have improved how a peptide can be delivered to the diseased heart tissue of mice.                                 

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A study has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. Investigators fond evidence that changing one amino acid in a subunit of an important receptor protein alters whether cocaine-experienced animals will resume drug seeking

Cocaine Addiction Target Identified in Rats

October 30, 2014 2:48 pm | by Massachusetts General Hospital | Comments

A study has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. Investigators fond evidence that changing one amino acid in a subunit of an important receptor protein alters whether cocaine-experienced animals will resume drug seeking after a period of cocaine abstinence.

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Over the past decade, China has poured money into research, especially in the biomedical sciences. But as the nation’s health-care costs have risen in the past few years, critics have argued that the investment has not paid off. A group of researchers and

China Opens Translational Medicine Center in Shanghai

October 30, 2014 2:14 pm | by David Cyranoski, Nature | Comments

Over the past decade, China has poured money into research, especially in the biomedical sciences. But as the nation’s health-care costs have risen in the past few years, critics have argued that the investment has not paid off. A group of researchers and government officials now hopes to improve those returns with the official opening of the National Centre for Translational Medicine in Shanghai.

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Fluorescent fruit flies have helped researchers take a critical step toward understanding the human brain’s neuronal “wiring” and how it can go awry.

Fruit Fly Illuminates Brain Wiring

October 30, 2014 2:03 pm | by Univ. of Queensland | Comments

Fluorescent fruit flies have helped researchers take a critical step toward understanding the human brain’s neuronal “wiring” and how it can go awry.                             

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Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory – creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, rangin

Mini-Stomachs Generated in Lab with Stem Cells

October 30, 2014 1:44 pm | by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center | Comments

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory — creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes.

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The ability to pop a working copy of a faulty gene into a patient’s genome is a tantalizing goal for many clinicians treating genetic diseases. Now, researchers have devised a new way to carry out this genetic sleight of hand.

New Genome Editing Method Could Cure Hemophilia in Mice

October 30, 2014 1:28 pm | Comments

The ability to pop a working copy of a faulty gene into a patient’s genome is a tantalizing goal for many clinicians treating genetic diseases. Now, researchers have devised a new way to carry out this genetic sleight of hand.       

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A unique mouse model of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism, and new research findings that may help improve the treatment of Graves' disease will be highlighted in oral and poster presentations at the 84th Annual Meeting o

Advances in Graves' Disease Include New Mouse Model

October 30, 2014 1:20 pm | by American Thyroid Association | Comments

A unique mouse model of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism, and new research findings that may help improve the treatment of Graves' disease will be highlighted in oral and poster presentations at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association in Coronado, California.

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Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumors. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. Now researchers have shown that one and the same cell of origi

Different Brain Tumors Have Same Origin

October 29, 2014 1:49 pm | by Linda Koffmar, Upsalla Univ. | Comments

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumors. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. Now researchers have shown that one and the same cell of origin can give rise to different types of glioma.

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Heavy drinking during adolescence may lead to structural changes in the brain and memory deficits that persist into adulthood, according to an animal study.

Heavy Drinking Produces Lasting Brain Changes, Memory Deficits in Adolescent Rats

October 29, 2014 1:39 pm | by Society for Neuroscience | Comments

Heavy drinking during adolescence may lead to structural changes in the brain and memory deficits that persist into adulthood, according to an animal study.                           

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Scientists have uncovered a major contributor to Huntington’s disease, a devastating progressive neurological condition that produces involuntary movements, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment.

Major Factor in Development of Huntington's Disease Uncovered in Mice

October 29, 2014 1:22 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | Comments

Scientists have uncovered a major contributor to Huntington’s disease, a devastating progressive neurological condition that produces involuntary movements, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment.             

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A new effort mapping 24-hr patterns of expression for thousands of genes in 12 different mouse organs – five years in the making – provides important clues about how the role of timing may influence the way drugs work in the body.

Mouse Genome Shows Timing Efficacious for Drug Delivery

October 29, 2014 8:43 am | by Penn Medicine | Comments

A new effort mapping 24-hr patterns of expression for thousands of genes in 12 different mouse organs — five years in the making — provides important clues about how the role of timing may influence the way drugs work in the body.

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Researchers studied lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster and found that that the blood brain barrier is a main sensor to report the nutritional status, especially the lipid composition of consumed food to special neurons which in turn regulate Insulin

Lipids, Not Calories, Trigger Strong Insulin Response

October 28, 2014 3:46 pm | by Max Planck Society | Comments

Researchers studied lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster and found that that the blood brain barrier is a main sensor to report the nutritional status, especially the lipid composition of consumed food to special neurons which in turn regulate Insulin release. Calories play a rather minor role in this process.

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A study has revealed the underlying genetic factors that help repair skin lesions caused by psoriasis, which could engender new methods of controlling the lingering condition.

Healing Mechanism Identified in Mice with Psoriasis Lesions

October 28, 2014 3:04 pm | by UCLA | Comments

A study has revealed the underlying genetic factors that help repair skin lesions caused by psoriasis, which could engender new methods of controlling the lingering condition.                     

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Difficulty in conceiving a child is a major challenge for one in seven heterosexual couples in America, especially for those over the age of 35. Now a new discovery could boost the chances of conception in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) tre

Trying to Slow Biological Clock in Mice

October 28, 2014 2:49 pm | by American Friends of Tel Aviv Univ. | Comments

Difficulty in conceiving a child is a major challenge for one in seven heterosexual couples in America, especially for those over the age of 35. Now a new discovery could boost the chances of conception in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.

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Do blood vessels that feed tumors differ from other blood vessels? Fourteen   years ago, experiments designed to answer that question led to the discovery   of several genes that are more active in tumor-associated blood vessels than   in normal blood ves

Tumor Blood Vessels Share Gene with Brain Blood Vessels

October 28, 2014 2:37 pm | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | Comments

Do blood vessels that feed tumors differ from other blood vessels? Fourteen years ago, experiments designed to answer that question led to the discovery of several genes that are more active in tumor-associated blood vessels than in normal blood vessels. Research now reveals the normal function of one of those genes and suggests it could be a good target for anticancer drug therapy.

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