Advertisement
 
News
Subscribe to Controlled Environments

The Lead

 A study has shown in an animal model that breathing air with a higher than usual concentration of oxygen can alter certain metabolic pathways to allow chemotherapy and immunotherapy to shrink tumors more effectively.

Extra Oxygen Shrinks Tumors in Mice

March 5, 2015 | by University of Pittsburgh | Comments

A study has shown in an animal model that breathing air with a higher than usual concentration of oxygen can alter certain metabolic pathways to allow chemotherapy and immunotherapy to shrink tumors more effectively.

TOPICS:
View
Sample

SUBSCRIBE TO FREE ALN EMAIL NEWSLETTER

A growing body of work suggests that exposure to certain chemicals — found in nature as well as industry — may play an essential role by driving the body to produce and store surplus fat in its tissues. Evidence of that cause-and-effect relationship in hu

How Lab Rats are Changing Our View of Obesity

March 6, 2015 12:37 pm | by Dina Fine Maron, Scientific American | Comments

A growing body of work suggests that exposure to certain chemicals — found in nature as well as industry — may play an essential role by driving the body to produce and store surplus fat in its tissues. Evidence of that cause-and-effect relationship in humans is still limited, but in laboratory animals and in petri dishes data linking the chemicals to problematic weight gain are mounting.

TOPICS:
A team of scientists have pioneered the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to “knock out,” or turn off, all genes across the genome systematically in an animal model of cancer, revealing genes involved in tumor evolution and metastasis and paving

Gene-Editing Tech Sheds Light on Metastasis, Tumor Evolution

March 6, 2015 10:58 am | by Broad Institute | Comments

A team of scientists have pioneered the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to “knock out,” or turn off, all genes across the genome systematically in an animal model of cancer, revealing genes involved in tumor evolution and metastasis and paving the way for similar studies in other cell types and diseases.

TOPICS:
By studying specially bred mice with specific developmental and cognitive traits resembling those seen in schizophrenia, researchers have provided new evidence that abnormal rhythmic activity in particular brain cells contributes to problems with learning

Abnormal Brain Rhythms Tied to Problems with Thinking in Schizophrenia

March 6, 2015 10:39 am | by Pete Farley, UC San Francisco | Comments

By studying specially bred mice with specific developmental and cognitive traits resembling those seen in schizophrenia, researchers have provided new evidence that abnormal rhythmic activity in particular brain cells contributes to problems with learning, attention, and decision-making in individuals with that disorder.

TOPICS:
Advertisement
A study reveals a new biological pathway that regulates anxiety and obesity and suggests that a drug currently in clinical trials to treat obesity might also provide a promising way to combat anxiety disorders.

Appetite Drug Also Fights Fights Anxiety in Mice

March 6, 2015 10:19 am | by University of Ottawa | Comments

A study reveals a new biological pathway that regulates anxiety and obesity and suggests that a drug currently in clinical trials to treat obesity might also provide a promising way to combat anxiety disorders.

TOPICS:
Researchers have identified a key piece in the complex molecular puzzle underlying   heart failure. In a study, they explored the heart’s progression from initial   weakening to heart failure, and found that a protein, known as RBFox2, plays a   critical

Protein's Pivotal Role in Heart Failure Discovered in Mice

March 6, 2015 9:52 am | by Bonnie Ward, UC San Diego | Comments

Researchers have identified a key piece in the complex molecular puzzle underlying heart failure. In a study, they explored the heart’s progression from initial weakening to heart failure, and found that a protein, known as RBFox2, plays a critical role in this process. 

TOPICS:
A molecule found in some plants can combat weight gain induced by a high-fat diet, but only in female mice, not males. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is thought to mimic the effects of a growth factor induced by exercise.

Molecule From Trees Helps Female Mice Resist Weight Gain

March 6, 2015 9:10 am | by Emory University | Comments

A molecule found in some plants can combat weight gain induced by a high-fat diet, but only in female mice, not males. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is thought to mimic the effects of a growth factor induced by exercise.

TOPICS:
Research has discovered gene interactions that determine whether cells live or die in such conditions as age-related macular degeneration and ischemic stroke. These common molecular mechanisms in vision and brain integrity can prevent blindness and also p

Retina Protein May Help Prevent Blindness and Stroke

March 5, 2015 11:02 am | by LSU Health Sciences Center | Comments

Research has discovered gene interactions that determine whether cells live or die in such conditions as age-related macular degeneration and ischemic stroke. These common molecular mechanisms in vision and brain integrity can prevent blindness and also promote recovery from a stroke.

TOPICS:
A study reveals for the first time exactly how mutations associated with the most common form of inherited Alzheimer’s disease produce the disorder’s devastating effects.

Mechanism Behind Most Common Form of Inherited Alzheimer's Disease Revealed

March 5, 2015 8:37 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | Comments

A study reveals for the first time exactly how mutations associated with the most common form of inherited Alzheimer’s disease produce the disorder’s devastating effects. 

TOPICS:
Advertisement
Researchers have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection.

Salt Fights Infection in Mice

March 4, 2015 12:55 pm | by Vanderbilt University | Comments

Researchers have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection.

TOPICS:
A novel research study reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents – the mutations that make us who we are instead of some other p

Genetically, Mammals are More Like Their Fathers

March 4, 2015 9:58 am | by University of North Carolina Health Care | Comments

A novel research study reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents – the mutations that make us who we are instead of some other person – we actually “use” more of the DNA that we inherit from our dads.

TOPICS:
It may be possible to live longer and increase fertility by manipulating diet, according to research in mice.

Diet Key to Lifespan and Fertility

March 4, 2015 9:40 am | by University of Sydney | Comments

It may be possible to live longer and increase fertility by manipulating diet, according to research in mice.

TOPICS:
A team of investigators have developed an antibody which has proven 100 percent protective against the virus in two species of animal models.

Compound Protects 100% of Ferrets, Mice From H5N1

March 4, 2015 9:23 am | by American Society for Microbiology | Comments

A team of investigators have developed an antibody which has proven 100 percent protective against the virus in two species of animal models.

TOPICS:
Biologists have determined how the loss of a gene in male mice results in the premature exhaustion of their fertility. Their fundamental new insights into the complex process of sperm generation may have direct applications to a similar loss of fertility

Mutation Causes Early Loss of Sperm Supply in Mice

March 4, 2015 9:09 am | Comments

Biologists have determined how the loss of a gene in male mice results in the premature exhaustion of their fertility. Their fundamental new insights into the complex process of sperm generation may have direct applications to a similar loss of fertility in men.

TOPICS:
Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases

New Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis Target Identified in Mice

March 4, 2015 9:03 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | Comments

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases.

TOPICS:
Researchers have identified a novel role for a signaling mechanism in lung cells that permanently places them into a state of suspended animation called senescence. Alive but unable to do much of anything, including divide, senescent cells cannot become c

Halting Cell Division Protects Lung Cells in Mice From Cancer

March 3, 2015 11:50 am | by Sharon Parmet, University of Illinois | Comments

Researchers have identified a novel role for a signaling mechanism in lung cells that permanently places them into a state of suspended animation called senescence. Alive but unable to do much of anything, including divide, senescent cells cannot become cancerous. Drugs that can induce senescence through this signaling pathway would represent a new class of chemotherapy.

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading