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Enzyme Fights Inflammation in Kidneys

June 30, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

The enzyme IDO helps reduce inflammation in cells damaged by kidney disease in an animal model, according to a new study from Georgia Regents University. IDO also reduced inflammation in human kidney tissue.

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Study Finds Males May Contribute to Offspring's Mental Development Before Pregnancy

July 1, 2015 12:20 pm | Comments

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring’s brains starting before pregnancy.

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Sialic Acid: A Key to Unlocking Brain Disorders

July 1, 2015 10:56 am | Comments

A new report suggests that a common molecule found in higher animals, including humans, affects brain structure. The study, involving mice, shows that small changes in how sialic acid attaches to cell surfaces result in damaging effects on brain structure, poor motor skills, hyperactivity, and difficulty in learning.

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Cheek Muscles Hold Up Better Than Leg Muscles in Space

July 1, 2015 10:40 am | Comments

It is well known that muscles need resistance to maintain optimal health, and when they do not have this resistance, they deteriorate. A new report using mice, however, suggests that this might not be true for all muscles, offering hope that there may be ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for individuals in low-resistance environments, whether it be the microgravity of space, extended periods in a hospital bed, or behind a desk.

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Thermosensory Gene Responsible for Increased Activity During the Summer

July 1, 2015 10:13 am | Comments

The warm temperature on a summer’s day is often a time for relaxing, but researchers from the University of Leicester have suggested that a ‘thermosensory’ gene could be responsible for changes in behavior in different climates, based on research in fruit flies.

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Marine Invertebrate Gives Clues to Tissue Regeneration

July 1, 2015 9:38 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

A common filter-feeding marine invertebrate found in coral reefs is able to eject and regenerate its gut within 12 days and rebuild it's branchial sac within 19 days, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. This finding could lead to promising new avenues in human soft tissue regeneration research.

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Researchers have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another.

Understanding Why Animals are Healthy Offers Path to Precision Medicine

June 30, 2015 1:09 pm | by Duke University | Comments

Researchers have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another. 

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Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome patients suffer symptoms including albinism, visual impairment, and slow blood clotting, but what makes some versions of the genetic condition fatal is that patients with some forms of the disease develop severe and progressive l

New Strategies Against Rare, Fatal Lung Syndrome Demonstrated in Mice

June 30, 2015 12:41 pm | by Brown University | Comments

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome patients suffer symptoms including albinism, visual impairment, and slow blood clotting, but what makes some versions of the genetic condition fatal is that patients with some forms of the disease develop severe and progressive lung scarring. A new study explains what appears to be going wrong and demonstrates two possible therapeutic strategies in lab experiments.

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PRI-Bio has been selected by McCarthy/Mortenson and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to provide multiple bio-hazardous waste decontamination systems for the $835 million National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, a DHS Science and Technology Director

PRI-Bio to Provide Bio-Hazardous Waste Decontamination System for DHS Facility

June 29, 2015 1:43 pm | by PRI-Bio | Comments

PRI-Bio has been selected by McCarthy/Mortenson and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to provide multiple bio-hazardous waste decontamination systems for the $835 million National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, a DHS Science and Technology Directorate project located in Manhattan, Kansas.

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Studies on mice reveal that a special protein in the brain’s tiniest blood vessels may affect the risk of stroke.

Key Protein Affects Risk of Stroke in Mice

June 29, 2015 1:29 pm | by Carina Eliasson, University of Gothenberg | Comments

Studies on mice reveal that a special protein in the brain’s tiniest blood vessels may affect the risk of stroke.

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When rats rest, their brains simulate journeys to a desired future such as a tasty treat, finds new research.

Rats 'Dream' Paths to a Brighter Future

June 29, 2015 1:17 pm | by University College London | Comments

When rats rest, their brains simulate journeys to a desired future such as a tasty treat, finds new research.

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Future therapies for failing hearts are likely to include stem-like cells and   associated growth factors that regenerate heart muscle. Scientists have just taken an   important step towards that future by identifying a stem-like “progenitor” cell that

Progenitor Cell Exclusively Forms Heart Muscle in Mouse Embryos

June 29, 2015 1:04 pm | by Penn Medicine | Comments

Future therapies for failing hearts are likely to include stem-like cells and associated growth factors that regenerate heart muscle. Scientists have just taken an important step towards that future by identifying a stem-like “progenitor” cell that produces only heart muscle cells.

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Researchers have successfully stopped cocaine and alcohol addiction in experiments using a drug already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat high blood pressure. If the treatment is proven effective in humans, it would be the f

Blood Pressure Drug Erases Memories Causing Addiction in Rats

June 29, 2015 12:53 pm | by Marc Airhart, University of Texas at Austin | Comments

Researchers have successfully stopped cocaine and alcohol addiction in experiments using a drug already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat high blood pressure. If the treatment is proven effective in humans, it would be the first of its kind — one that could help prevent relapses by erasing the unconscious memories that underlie addiction.

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Drug Delivered Via Nanoparticle Halts Progression of Atherosclerosis in Mice

June 29, 2015 8:16 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a novel method to treat atherosclerosis by loading nanoparticles with a chemical that helps the animals' body better deal with cholesterol. This finding may lead to new treatments for cardiovascular disease.

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Fight or Flight Neural Pathway Mapped in Mouse Brain

June 26, 2015 10:22 am | Comments

A mouse confronted with danger is likely to either freeze in place or run for its life. But how this primal response is elicited in the brain has remained murky. A study in mice published in Science reveals specific neuronal wiring that runs between the eye and the amygdala that translates the sight of an advancing threat to the animal’s instinct to freeze or flee.

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Contec, Inc. Wins Award for Charitable Giving to United Way of the Piedmont

June 26, 2015 9:52 am | Contec, Inc. | Comments

Contec, Inc.’s employees have been recognized with the Employee Giving Award from the United Way of the Piedmont for their generous contributions during the United Way 2014/2015 Campaign. This award is given to the company with the highest percentage increase in employee giving and represents Contec’s commitment to supporting community initiatives in the Upstate of South Carolina.

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