Advertisement
 
News
Subscribe to Controlled Environments

The Lead

Vaccine Reduces Dust-mite Allergies in Lab Animals

July 23, 2014 | by Richard Lewis, Univ. of Iowa | Comments

Researchers have developed a vaccine that can combat dust-mite allergies by naturally switching the body’s immune response. In animal tests, the nano-sized vaccine package lowered lung inflammation by 83 percent despite repeated exposure to the allergens.

TOPICS:
View
Sample

SUBSCRIBE TO FREE ALN EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.

Therapeutic Bacteria Prevents Obesity in Mice

July 23, 2014 1:31 pm | by Vanderbilt Univ. | Comments

Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, investigators have discovered.                   

TOPICS:
A team of scientists has identified a key regulator of developmental timing. The researchers describe how LIN-42, a gene that is found in animals across the evolutionary tree, governs a broad range of events throughout development.

Gene Found in Worms Controls Timing of Events during Maturation

July 22, 2014 2:45 pm | by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory | Comments

A team of scientists has identified a key regulator of developmental timing. The researchers describe how LIN-42, a gene that is found in animals across the evolutionary tree, governs a broad range of events throughout development.     

TOPICS:
Cold-blooded animals cannot regulate their body temperature, so their cells are stressed when facing temperature extremes. Worse still, even at slightly colder temperatures, some biological processes in the cell are slowed down more than others, which sho

Process Helps Fruit Flies Cope with the Cold

July 22, 2014 2:25 pm | by Univ. of Rochester | Comments

Cold-blooded animals cannot regulate their body temperature, so their cells are stressed when facing temperature extremes. Worse still, even at slightly colder temperatures, some biological processes in the cell are slowed down more than others, which should throw the cells’ delicate chemical balance out of whack. Yet, those cells manage to keep their biological processes coordinated. Now, researchers have found out how they do that.

TOPICS:
Advertisement
Scientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. Now re

NIH-supported Scientists Demonstrate Very Early Formation of SIV Reservoir

July 22, 2014 2:17 pm | by NIH | Comments

cientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. Now researchers report that SIV can become entrenched in tissues fewer than 3 days after infection, before the virus is detectable in blood plasma (the liquid part) or blood cells.

TOPICS:
A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.

Stem Cells Help Mice Bulk Up

July 22, 2014 2:10 pm | by Diana Yates, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Comments

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise. Researchers were able to increase the rate of repair and enhance the growth and strength of muscles in exercising mice.   

TOPICS:

Access Technologies Acquires Solomon Scientific Product Lines

July 22, 2014 8:29 am | Access Technologies | Comments

Access Technologies, a provider of infusion devices, has announced that it has completed the acquisition of the Solomon Scientific port, catheter and needle product lines.                       

Pathogen Mishaps Rise as Regulators Stay Clear

July 21, 2014 1:23 pm | by Denise Grady, The New York Times | Comments

The recently documented mistakes at federal laboratories involving anthrax, flu and smallpox have incited public outrage at the government’s handling of dangerous pathogens. But the episodes were just a tiny fraction of the hundreds that have occurred in recent years across a sprawling web of academic, commercial and government labs that operate without clear national standards or oversight, federal reports show.

TOPICS:

DNA Mapping Technique Could Reduce Mice Needed for Research

July 21, 2014 1:09 pm | by BBSRC | Comments

Researchers have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. This approach will boost understanding of embryonic development, could enhance clinical applications like cancer therapy and fertility treatments, and has the potential to reduce the number of mice currently needed for this research.

TOPICS:
Advertisement

Immune Cell Role in Intestinal Movement Seen in Mice

July 21, 2014 12:56 pm | by Pennsylvania State Univ. | Comments

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).                   

TOPICS:

Fish Oil Reduces Alcoholic Neurodegeneration in Rats

July 21, 2014 12:46 pm | by Loyola Univ. Health Sciences | Comments

Omega-3 fish oil might help protect against alcohol-related neurodamage and the risk of eventual dementia, according to a study.                                   

TOPICS:

Cat Parasite Fights Cancer

July 18, 2014 4:48 pm | by Norris Cotton Cancer Center | Comments

From the litter box to the laboratory, a microscopic organism native to cats shows promise in treating cancer. A mutated strain of T. gondii reprograms the natural power of the immune system to kill cells.             

TOPICS:

Obesity, Inflammation and Insulin Resistance Linked in Mice

July 18, 2014 11:45 am | by Susan Gammon, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute | Comments

A study has identified a new signal that triggers the events leading to insulin resistance in obesity. The signal causes inflammation in adipose tissue and leads to metabolic disease, suggesting that blocking this signal may protect against the development of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, and other disorders caused by obesity-linked inflammation.

TOPICS:

Viral Relics Show Cancer's 'Footprint' on Our Evolution

July 18, 2014 11:29 am | by Univ. of Oxford | Comments

Cancer has left its "footprint" on our evolution, according to a study which examined how the relics of ancient viruses are preserved in the genomes of 38 mammal species.                       

TOPICS:

Lipoic Acid Restores, Synchronizes Circadian Rhythm in Aging Animals

July 18, 2014 11:06 am | by Oregon State Univ. | Comments

Researchers have discovered a possible explanation for the surprisingly large range of biological effects that are linked to a micronutrient called lipoic acid: It appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock” found in most life forms.

TOPICS:

Glenbrook's LabScope Chosen by University of Missouri's School of Medicine

July 18, 2014 10:38 am | by Glenbrook Technologies | Comments

Glenbrook Technologies has been chosen by the University of Missouri School of Medicine to design and build a high resolution fluoroscopic x-ray system that has the ability to continuously monitor and record the gullet of a live mouse as it is swallowing. 

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading