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In Mice, Neutrophils Seek Help When an Injury is Infected

May 19, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

Neutrophils, which form the bulk of our immune system, behave differently depending on whether an injury is infected or not, according to a new study in mice by the Garvan Institute.

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Paracetamol in Pregnancy May Lower Testosterone in Unborn Boys

May 22, 2015 10:02 am | Comments

Prolonged paracetamol use by pregnant women may reduce testosterone production in unborn baby boys, research has found. Researchers say their findings could help to explain reported links between paracetamol use in pregnancy and reproductive health problems in young boys.

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Experimental Ebola Treatment Boosts Survival in Mice

May 22, 2015 10:00 am | Comments

The number of new Ebola cases is tapering off, but the search for new treatments continues. Now, one research team has found potential drug candidates that successfully treated up to 90 percent of mice exposed to the Ebola virus.

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Scientists Create Mice with a Major Genetic Cause of ALS and FTD

May 22, 2015 10:00 am | Comments

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72.

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Molecule Designed to Treat Lung Cancer Shows Promise in Mice

May 21, 2015 9:59 am | Comments

A multidisciplinary team has identified a new therapy for lung cancer, the most common cancer worldwide. The treatment involves a molecule, RK-33, that interrupts the cell cycle of lung cancer cells without harming normal cells, and is effective both on its own and in combination with radiation therapy.

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Vitamin E Helps with Membrane Repair to Keep Muscles Healthy

May 21, 2015 9:47 am | by Toni Baker, Georgia Regents University and Health System | Comments

Vitamin E has long known as a powerful antioxidant, and now scientists have shown that without it, the plasma membrane, which essentially keeps a cell from spilling its contents and controls what moves in and out, cannot properly heal. That’s a big problem for many cells, such as muscle cells, which get membrane tears just from being used.

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Age-reversal Effects of 'Young Blood' Molecule GDF-11 Called Into Question

May 21, 2015 9:30 am | Comments

The vampiric exchange of young blood and old blood has long been reported to have anti-aging effects, but it was in 2013 when researchers first linked GDF-11, a molecule that circulates in the blood, to this effect. Now, an analysis that set out to see how GDF-11 works in the muscles found just the opposite.

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Skipping Meals Linked to Abdominal Weight Gain in Mice

May 20, 2015 10:26 am | by Emily Caldwell, The Ohio State University | Comments

In a new study, mice that ate all of their food as a single meal and fasted the rest of the day developed insulin resistance in their livers. The mice also showed greater weight gain around their middles than mice that were free fed, which has been associated with insulin resistance and risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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Gel Filled with Nanosponges Cleans Up MRSA Infections in Mice

May 20, 2015 9:58 am | by Liezel Labios, University of California, San Diego | Comments

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a gel filled with toxin-absorbing nanosponges that could lead to an effective treatment for skin and wound infections caused by MRSA, an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This nanosponge-hydrogel minimized the growth of skin lesions on mice infected with MRSA – without the use of antibiotics.

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Bigger Capsules May Be Key for Treating Type 1 Diabetes in Animal Models

May 20, 2015 9:47 am | by Sharon Parmet, University of Illinois at Chicago | Comments

Changing the size of cell-carrying spheres may surmount the difficulties that have bedeviled diabetes researchers trying to ferry insulin-producing islet cells into hosts as a way to treat type 1 diabetes. New findings published in the journal Nature Materials suggest that for the spherical capsules, bigger may be better.

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Exposure to Alcohol Changes a Mouse Offspring's Brain Even in Early Pregnancy

May 20, 2015 9:34 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

The offspring of mice who drank alcohol in early pregnancy showed changes in gene function in their brain and other tissues, according to a recent study from the University of Helsinki. The changes were present in the offspring of mice exposed to alcohol in the time period corresponding to the human gestational weeks 3-6, a time period where many mothers-to-be are typically unaware of the fact that they are pregnant.

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Art's-Way Scientific Wins Modular Building Institute Award For Iowa State University Transgenic Swine Facility

May 19, 2015 5:01 pm | Art's Way Scientific, Inc. | Comments

Art's Way Manufacturing Co., Inc. announces that Art's-Way Scientific was awarded a 2015 Award of Distinction by the Modular Building Institute (MBI), at the annual MBI World of Modular Conference in Las Vegas, NV.  The award winning modular transgenic swine facility was designed, manufactured and installed for Iowa State University's Zumwalt Station Farm in Ames, IA.

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A molecule important in blood vessel formation and brain wiring is also essential for the onset of puberty, new research finds.

Missing Molecule Prevents Puberty

May 19, 2015 9:54 am | by University College London | Comments

A molecule important in blood vessel formation and brain wiring is also essential for the onset of puberty, new research finds.

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DREADD — Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs - are protein receptors altered in a lab so that only a specific synthetic chemical can bind and activate them. Scientists can then create genetically modified animals in which only a spe

Controlling Brain Circuits in Mice

May 19, 2015 8:08 am | by NIH | Comments

DREADD - Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs - are protein receptors altered in a lab so that only a specific synthetic chemical can bind and activate them. Scientists use them to create genetically modified animals in which only a specific set of neurons contains the receptor. Now, researchers have developed a new DREADD by changing the structure of a naturally occurring receptor.

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FDA Releases Draft Guidance on Animal Drug Compounding from Bulk Drug Substances

May 19, 2015 8:06 am | by FDA | Comments

As part of its overall efforts to address compounded drugs, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released its latest draft. FDA’s GFI #230 outlines specific conditions under which the agency generally does not intend to take action against state-licensed pharmacies, veterinarians, and facilities registered as outsourcing facilities when drugs are compounded for animals from bulk drug substances.

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Using fruit flies to study the basic components of emotion, a new study reports that a fly's response to a shadowy overhead stimulus might be analogous to a negative emotional state such as fear — a finding that could one day help us understand the neural

Do Fruit Flies Have Emotions?

May 18, 2015 11:31 am | by Jessica Stoller-Conrad, Caltech | Comments

Using fruit flies to study the basic components of emotion, a new study reports that a fly's response to a shadowy overhead stimulus might be analogous to a negative emotional state such as fear — a finding that could one day help us understand the neural circuitry involved in human emotion.

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