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Live Imaging Shows Researchers How Taste Works

April 28, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

For the first time, an international team of scientists have captured live images of the process of taste on the tongue of a mouse with a specially designed microscope system. The images may lead to discoveries that could help in dietary disorders.

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IVF Device Improves Fertility in Mice

May 1, 2015 10:14 am | Comments

To make IVF more efficient, a team of researchers from National Tsing Hua University and the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan has developed a technique to more effectively grow and screen embryos prior to implantation. Their results could facilitate more targeted selection of embryos to implant, lead to higher IVF success rates, and ultimately and lower its cost.

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SLAVT Forms Working Group for Veterinary Technician Specialty

May 1, 2015 10:03 am | Comments

SLAVT has an organizing committee that is creating a veterinary technician specialty (VTS) in laboratory animal medicine. The committee is in the process of forming an Academy of Laboratory Animal Veterinary Technicians (ALAVT), which will be recognized by the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA) and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).

Key Factor in Neural Death during Parkinson's Disease Identified

April 30, 2015 10:31 am | Comments

In studying the molecular biology of brain development, a team of researchers has discovered how disruption of a developmental mechanism alters the very nerve cells that are most affected in Parkinson’s disease. 

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Gene Mapping Reveals Soy's Roles in Breast Cancer

April 30, 2015 9:59 am | by Sharita Forrest, University of Illinois | Comments

Scientists have mapped the human genes triggered by the phytonutrients in soy, revealing the complex role the legume plays in both preventing and advancing breast cancer.

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How the Brain Determines if a Memory is Good or Bad

April 29, 2015 4:24 pm | Comments

Neuroscientists have discovered brain circuitry for encoding positive and negative learned associations in mice. After finding that two circuits showed opposite activity following fear and reward learning, the researchers proved that this divergent activity causes either avoidance or reward-driven behaviors.

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Body Clock's Molecular Reset Button Discovered

April 29, 2015 10:42 am | Comments

An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities, commonly associated with jet lag, shift work and exposure to light at night, as well as with neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and autism.

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Silica Exposure Speeds Lung Cancer Progression in Mice

April 29, 2015 9:55 am | Comments

Researchers at the University of Louisville have detailed a critical connection associated with a major environmental cause of silicosis and a form of lung cancer. Exposure to crystalline silica is common to a variety of industrial operations. Chronic silica exposure causes severe health complications eventually leading to the irreversible, debilitating disease silicosis.

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Studylog Systems Named Best of Show Winner at 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

April 29, 2015 9:42 am | Studylog Systems | Comments

Studylog Systems has announced that its Studylog Animal Study Workflow Software was named Best of Show Award Winner at the 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo, receiving the special “Judges Prize, Craftsmanship Award", which is awarded for “a product that provides a point solution to a particular problem and appears to do so perfectly.”

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Telomere Dysfunction Linked to Liver Diseases

April 29, 2015 9:33 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

Telomeric dysfunction is a potential factor in triggering human diseases associated with long-term or chronic liver damage such as hepatitis or cirrhosis, according to a new study involving mice published in the Journal of Hepatology.

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MS is a disease in which a nerve-insulating compound called myelin is mistakenly attacked by the immune system. The breakdown of myelin disrupts communication between the brain and the body, leading to muscle weakness, numbness, and problems with vision,

Drugs Lessen Multiple Sclerosis Damage in Mice

April 28, 2015 9:21 am | by NIH | Comments

MS is a disease in which a nerve-insulating compound called myelin is mistakenly attacked by the immune system. The breakdown of myelin disrupts communication between the brain and the body, leading to muscle weakness, numbness, and problems with vision, coordination, and balance. Recently, A research team investigated whether drugs already approved for other uses could stimulate OPCs and boost myelination.

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New research represents a potentially fundamental shift in our understanding of how nerve cells in the brain generate the energy needed to function. The study shows neurons are more independent than previously believed and this research has implications f

Brain’s Source of Power Doesn't Need a Middleman

April 28, 2015 8:35 am | by University of Rochester Medical Center | Comments

New research represents a potentially fundamental shift in our understanding of how nerve cells in the brain generate the energy needed to function. The study shows neurons are more independent than previously believed and this research has implications for a range of neurological disorders.  

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An enzyme secreted by the body’s fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body’s fat tissue in controlling the brain’s response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an op

Fat Signals Control Energy Levels in the Brain

April 28, 2015 8:34 am | by Julia Evangelou Strait, Washington University in St. Louis | Comments

An enzyme secreted by the body’s fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body’s fat tissue in controlling the brain’s response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity.

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Investigators have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study also describes a strategy of preventi

Stem-Cells Treat Brain-Metastatic Breast Cancer in Mice

April 28, 2015 8:34 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | Comments

Investigators have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. The study also describes a strategy of preventing the potential negative consequences of stem cell therapy. 

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In a new study, researchers have made insights into how the blood-brain barrier, or BBB, is maintained, identifying a protein key to the process. Delivering this protein to mice with the rodent equivalent of MS improved their symptoms.

How Blood-Brain Barrier is Maintained

April 27, 2015 10:56 am | by University of Pennsylvania | Comments

In a new study, researchers have made insights into how the blood-brain barrier, or BBB, is maintained, identifying a protein key to the process. Delivering this protein to mice with the rodent equivalent of MS improved their symptoms.

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A team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas.

Hundreds of Cancer Possibilities Arise From Common Skin Mole Mutation

April 27, 2015 10:37 am | Comments

A team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas.

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