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Tasting and spitting out toxic food is a survival trait shared by many complex organisms. Now researchers have shown that a simple roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, has the ability to spit out potentially deadly substances — a finding that could have sur

Roundworm Spit Sheds Light on Human Heart Function

July 28, 2015 | by Rob Matheson, MIT | Comments

Tasting and spitting out toxic food is a survival trait shared by many complex organisms. Now researchers have shown that a simple roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, has the ability to spit out potentially deadly substances — a finding that could have surprising implications for human heart research.

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Small Genetic Differences Could Mean Life-and-death for Gut Infection

July 29, 2015 10:16 am | Comments

Considering how many microorganisms we ingest each day, our gut has an extensive and well-developed immune system. This defense is involved in acute and chronic gut diseases, but it varies dramatically among people. A persistent question is how our genetic make-up affects our gut’s ability to fight infections.

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New Treatment Options for a Fatal Leukemia

July 29, 2015 10:07 am | Comments

In industrialized countries like Switzerland acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents the most frequent type of cancer in children. Together with international researchers, a pediatric oncologist from the University of Zurich has now succeeded in decoding a rare but always fatal subtype of this leukemia and in obtaining pointers for new therapeutic possibilities.

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Major European Mouse Study Reveals the Role of Genes in Disease

July 29, 2015 9:58 am | Comments

The functions of around 150 genes have been discovered by scientists across Europe in a major initiative to try to understand the part they play in disease and biology.

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Exercise Mimicking Molecule May Help Treat Diabetes and Obesity

July 29, 2015 9:47 am | Comments

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a molecule that acts as an exercise mimic, which could potentially help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity.

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A new drug that blocks cancer’s escape route from chemotherapy could be used to treat deadly lung and pancreatic cancers, new research reports.

'Chemotherapy Booster' Blocks DNA Repair in Lung and Pancreatic Cancer

July 28, 2015 8:24 am | by The Institute of Cancer Research | Comments

A new drug that blocks cancer’s escape route from chemotherapy could be used to treat deadly lung and pancreatic cancers, new research reports.

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The brain’s effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group of researchers has found that it’s a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism.

Body Fat Sends Signals to Brain, Affecting Stress Response in Mice

July 27, 2015 1:00 pm | by Doug Bennett, University of Florida | Comments

The brain’s effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group of researchers has found that it’s a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism.

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Investigators recently achieved great success with a study involving biomedical research on mouse models. The research group used tangible examples to demonstrate how the side effects of genetic modification of mice can complicate the interpretation of bi

Tool Developed for More Accurate Interpretation of Biomedical Research

July 27, 2015 12:29 pm | by VIB (The Flanders Institute for Biotechnology) | Comments

Investigators recently achieved great success with a study involving biomedical research on mouse models. The research group used tangible examples to demonstrate how the side effects of genetic modification of mice can complicate the interpretation of biomedical research.

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Like a collection of ragtag villagers fighting off an invading army, the mix of bacteria that live in our guts may band together to keep dangerous infections from taking hold, new research suggests. But some “villages” may succeed better than others at ho

Villages of Gut Bacteria Protect Mice From Dangerous Infections

July 27, 2015 12:14 pm | by University of Michigan | Comments

Like a collection of ragtag villagers fighting off an invading army, the mix of bacteria that live in our guts may band together to keep dangerous infections from taking hold, new research suggests. But some “villages” may succeed better than others at holding off the invasion, because of key differences in the kinds of bacteria that make up their feisty population, researchers report. 

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If you find yourself downing that extra piece of chocolate fudge cake even though you're not hungry, it might be the absence of a hormone in your brain that's causing you to overeat purely for pleasure.

Brain Hormone Regulates Overeating in Mice

July 27, 2015 11:57 am | by Rutgers University | Comments

If you find yourself downing that extra piece of chocolate fudge cake even though you're not hungry, it might be the absence of a hormone in your brain that's causing you to overeat purely for pleasure.

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When One Gene is Knocked Out, Others Step In

July 27, 2015 11:29 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

New research has found that when a gene is knocked out, other genes compensate for it's loss. The study in zebrafish, from Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, suggests caution when interpreting data from molecular biological studies or developing gene therapy to treat various diseases.

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Calming a neural circuit in the brain can alleviate stress in mice, according to new research that could lay the foundation for understanding stress and anxiety in people.

Brain's Role in Stress-Induced Anxiety Seen in Mice

July 24, 2015 9:10 am | by Jim Dryden, Washington University in St. Louis | Comments

Calming a neural circuit in the brain can alleviate stress in mice, according to new research that could lay the foundation for understanding stress and anxiety in people.

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Blood Vessels Can Actually Get Better with Age

July 24, 2015 8:30 am | Comments

Although the causes of many age-related diseases remain unknown, oxidative stress is thought to be the main culprit. Oxidative stress has been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases including diabetes, hypertension and age-related cancers. However, researchers at the University of Missouri recently found that aging actually offered significant protection against oxidative stress.

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Study Uncovers Mechanism Responsible for Pollen-induced Allergies

July 24, 2015 8:30 am | Comments

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a mechanism that is central to becoming allergic to ragweed pollen and developing allergic asthma or seasonal nasal allergies. The findings are currently available online in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology.

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For decades, the public has been told to avoid foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol. A new study led by the National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF) and published in PLOS ONE discovered a saturated fat, called heptadecanoic acid, that may help rev

Research with Dolphins Provides Hope for Prevention of Diabetes in Humans

July 24, 2015 8:29 am | Comments

For decades, the public has been told to avoid foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol. A new study led by the National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF) and published in PLOS ONE discovered a saturated fat, called heptadecanoic acid, that may help reverse prediabetes in humans.

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Zebrafish Reveal Drugs That May Improve Bone Marrow Transplant

July 24, 2015 8:28 am | Comments

Using large-scale zebrafish drug-screening models, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified a potent group of chemicals that helps bone marrow transplants engraft or "take." The findings, published in the July 23 issue of Nature, could lead to human trials in patients with cancer and blood disorders within a year or two, says senior investigator Leonard Zon, MD.

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