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Common Flame Retardant Causes Obesity in Rats

March 3, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems in laboratory rats. These problems can lead to insulin resistance, a major cause of obesity, according to a new study from the University of New Hampshire.

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Researchers have identified a novel role for a signaling mechanism in lung cells that permanently places them into a state of suspended animation called senescence. Alive but unable to do much of anything, including divide, senescent cells cannot become c

Halting Cell Division Protects Lung Cells in Mice From Cancer

March 3, 2015 11:50 am | by Sharon Parmet, University of Illinois | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a novel role for a signaling mechanism in lung cells that permanently places them into a state of suspended animation called senescence. Alive but unable to do much of anything, including divide, senescent cells cannot become cancerous. Drugs that can induce senescence through this signaling pathway would represent a new class of chemotherapy.

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What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inad

Impact of Copper Nanoparticles on Zebrafish Studied in the Lab

March 3, 2015 11:27 am | by Sean Nealon, University of California, Irvine | News | Comments

What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inadvertently exposed to them.

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Seattle-based Aquatic Enterprises Inc has announced its twenty-fifth year as a key player in the aquatic animal housing industry. Achieved using the philosophy of constant innovation and customer awareness, Aquatic Enterprises has grown from servicing res

Aquatic Enterprises Celebrates 25 Years

March 3, 2015 8:37 am | Aquatic Enterprises, Inc. | News | Comments

Seattle-based Aquatic Enterprises Inc has announced its twenty-fifth year as a key player in the aquatic animal housing industry. Aquatic Enterprises has grown from servicing residential fish tanks and ponds to manufacturing state-of-the art equipment for universities and schools, research institutes, public aquariums, fish hatcheries, seafood retailers and seafood wholesalers.

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Corrosion of stainless equipment is a significant problem. Corroded surfaces are difficult to clean and disinfect because the rough surfaces do not allow good wiping contact and provide places for bacteria to accumulate. ABRATEC abrasive cloths remove sur

Abrasive Cloths

March 3, 2015 8:35 am | by Contec, Inc. | Contec, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Corrosion of stainless equipment is a significant problem. Corroded surfaces are difficult to clean and disinfect because the rough surfaces do not allow good wiping contact and provide places for bacteria to accumulate. ABRATEC abrasive cloths remove surface rust and residue from stainless steel to make equipment look new. 

A key part of the brain involved with decision making, the striatum, appears to operate hierarchically – much like a traditional corporation with executives, middle managers and employees.

Brain's Decision-Making Structure Seen in Rats

March 2, 2015 10:52 am | by OIST | News | Comments

A key part of the brain involved with decision making, the striatum, appears to operate hierarchically – much like a traditional corporation with executives, middle managers and employees.

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A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a recent study.

Compounds Protect Against MS Nerve Damage in Mouse Models

March 2, 2015 10:32 am | by Mount Sinai Health System | News | Comments

A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a recent study.

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In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugs in a clinical setting:

Drugs With Anti-Stroke Potential Revived in Mice, Minus Side Effects

March 2, 2015 10:13 am | by Emory University | News | Comments

In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugs in a clinical setting: the side effects included disorientation and hallucinations. Now researchers have found a potential path around this obstacle.

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Q&A: Fostering Campus Outreach

March 2, 2015 8:37 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

This week's Tales From the Lab is Sandra Schenone, a Supervisor at Arizona State University (ASU) Department of Animal Care and Technologies (DACT). Schenone works with nonhuman primates in the laboratory and works closely with ASU on campus outreach about the animal research taking place.

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Scientists have demonstrated that a specialized DNA-binding protein called CTCF is essential for the precise expression of genes that control the body plan of a developing embryo.

Specialized Protein Assures Normal Cell Development in Mice

March 2, 2015 8:36 am | by NYC Langone Medical Center | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated that a specialized DNA-binding protein called CTCF is essential for the precise expression of genes that control the body plan of a developing embryo.

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In a recent study, researchers homed in on the culprit that fuels variable vulnerability within squamous cell cancers: exposure to a signal given off by immune cells that congregate next to a tumor’s blood vessels.

Growth Signal Influences Cancer Cells' Vulnerability to Drugs

March 2, 2015 8:35 am | by Rockefeller University | News | Comments

In a recent study, researchers homed in on the culprit that fuels variable vulnerability within squamous cell cancers: exposure to a signal given off by immune cells that congregate next to a tumor’s blood vessels.

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Researchers say that a small molecule called Tetrandrine derived from an Asian herb has shown to be a potent small molecule inhibiting infection of human white blood cells in vitro or petri dish experiments and prevented Ebola virus disease in mice.

Asian Herb Used as Treatment for Ebola in Mice

March 2, 2015 8:35 am | by Texas Biomedical Research Institute | News | Comments

Researchers say that a small molecule called Tetrandrine derived from an Asian herb has shown to be a potent small molecule inhibiting infection of human white blood cells in vitro or petri dish experiments and prevented Ebola virus disease in mice.

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GenoTyping Center of America now offers highly flexible zygosity testing services for transgenic animal models using hydrolysis probes to quantitatively determine if samples are homozygous or hemizygous with respect to the transgene of interest.

Zygosity Testing Services

March 2, 2015 8:33 am | by GenoTyping Center of America | Product Releases | Comments

GenoTyping Center of America now offers highly flexible zygosity testing services for transgenic animal models using hydrolysis probes to quantitatively determine if samples are homozygous or hemizygous with respect to the transgene of interest. 

A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans.

Cancer Drug First Tested in Pet Dogs Begins Human Trials

February 27, 2015 11:06 am | by Diana Yates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans.

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Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake, suggests new research.

Altering Perception of Feeding State Promotes Healthy Aging in Worms

February 27, 2015 10:56 am | News | Comments

Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake, suggests new research.

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Investigators have discovered two groups of neurons that play key roles in social interactions between primates – one that is activated when deciding whether to cooperate with another individual and another group involved in predicting what the other will

Monkeys Predict What Others Will Do

February 27, 2015 10:45 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | News | Comments

Investigators have discovered two groups of neurons that play key roles in social interactions between primates – one that is activated when deciding whether to cooperate with another individual and another group involved in predicting what the other will do.

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