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Designing and Managing the LIMS at PRBB's Animal Facility

May 28, 2015 | by Helen Kelly | Articles | Comments

Today's LIMS allow research institutions to monitor and manage a broad array of biomedical research processes end to end and remotely. But how do they accommodate tens of thousands of animals, the ongoing flood of discoveries in such as genetics, the -omics, regenerative medicine and behavior, ongoing adjustments to workflows and protocols, and the evolution of legislative, welfare quality, and ethics directives?

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A Robot that Can Perform Brain Surgery on a Fruit Fly

May 28, 2015 10:54 am | by John Markoff, The New York Times | News | Comments

On a small darkened platform a handful of fruit flies wander aimlessly. There is a brief flash of light and a robotic arm darts downward, precisely targeting a fly’s thorax, a moving target roughly the size of a pinhead. The fly seems unfazed, appearing not to notice that it has been snatched by a high-speed laboratory robot.

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Nest Building Bedding

May 27, 2015 5:26 pm | by Shepherd Specialty Papers | Shepherd Specialty Papers | Product Releases | Comments

By providing mice with materials that stimulate their natural instincts, they forage, gather and build nests similar to those built by their wild counterparts.

Animal Study Identifies Possible Role for Carbon Monoxide in Treating Hemorrhagic Stroke

May 27, 2015 11:49 am | News | Comments

Carbon monoxide is known by many as a poisonous gas that causes brain injury and other neurological symptoms, including memory loss and confusion. But a new study suggests the opposite may be true: When administered in small, carefully controlled amounts, carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a devastating stroke that results from bleeding in the brain.

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Changes in DNA During Withdrawal Spur Treatments for Addiction in Rats

May 27, 2015 11:21 am | News | Comments

One of the major challenges of cocaine addiction is the high rate of relapse after periods of withdrawal and abstinence. But new research reveals that changes in our DNA during drug withdrawal may offer promising ways of developing more effective treatments for addiction.

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Nanotechnology Identifies Brain Tumor Types Through MRI "Virtual Biopsy" in Animal Studies

May 27, 2015 10:29 am | News | Comments

Biomedical researchers at Cedars-Sinai have invented a tiny drug-delivery system that can identify cancer cell types in the brain through "virtual biopsies" and then attack the molecular structure of the disease. If laboratory research with mice is borne out in human studies, the results could be used to deliver nano-scale drugs that can distinguish and fight tumor cells in the brain without resorting to surgery.

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Researchers Grow Human Cancer Cells in Mouse Colon

May 27, 2015 10:16 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

Every day, it seems, someone in some lab is “curing cancer.” Well, it’s easy to kill cancer cells in a lab, but in a human, it’s a lot more complicated, which is why nearly all cancer drugs fail clinical trials. Taking steps to bridge this divide, researchers have created a comprehensive mouse model of exactly how colorectal tumors behave in real life - not just in a petri dish.

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Removing Mutant P53 Significantly Improves Cancer Survival in Mouse Model

May 27, 2015 10:07 am | News | Comments

Removing accumulated mutant p53 protein from a cancer model showed that tumors regress significantly and survival increases. This finding, by an international team of cancer researchers, is reported in a paper published advanced online May 25 in Nature.

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Rodents Are the Most Commonly Used Research Model in the Vivarium

May 27, 2015 9:49 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

Rodents, such as mice, rats and guinea pigs, are the most popular animal model used in the vivarium, according to a February 2015 ALN survey. Eighty-six percent of respondents indicated that they currently work with rodents. This number was more than double any of the other animal models used in the vivarium. Click here to view the rest of the results.

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A new study has demonstrated that a protein called Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) is critical for the Ebola virus to infect a host. The study suggests that drugs that block NPC1 could be used to treat this deadly disease.

New Target for Ebola Drugs Found in Mice

May 26, 2015 12:29 pm | by American Society For Microbiology | News | Comments

A new study has demonstrated that a protein called Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) is critical for the Ebola virus to infect a host. The study suggests that drugs that block NPC1 could be used to treat this deadly disease.

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Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice suggests. With the risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for men than women, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets.

Obese Male Mice Produce More Disease-Promoting Immune Cells Than Females

May 26, 2015 12:14 pm | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice suggests. With the risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for men than women, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets.

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The plot of many a science fiction TV series or movie revolves around the premise that people traveling long distances in space age more slowly than their counterparts on Earth. Now, tiny worms who spent time aboard the International Space Station could h

Watching Worms in Space Will Help Humans Age More Gracefully

May 26, 2015 11:52 am | by Melissa Gaskill, NASA | News | Comments

The plot of many a science fiction TV series or movie revolves around the premise that people traveling long distances in space age more slowly than their counterparts on Earth. Now, tiny worms who spent time aboard the International Space Station could help humans understand more about the effects of aging in space for real.

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Having a healthy gut may well depend on maintaining a complex signaling dance between immune cells and the stem cells that line the intestine. Scientists are now reporting significant new insight into how these complex interactions control intestinal rege

Complex Signaling Between Blood and Stem Cells Controls Regeneration in Fly Gut

May 26, 2015 11:33 am | by Buck Institute for Research on Aging | News | Comments

Having a healthy gut may well depend on maintaining a complex signaling dance between immune cells and the stem cells that line the intestine. Scientists are now reporting significant new insight into how these complex interactions control intestinal regeneration after a bacterial infection.

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Reporting on their study with lab-grown human cells and mice, researchers say that blocking a second blood vessel growth protein, along with one that is already well-known, could offer a new way to treat and prevent a blinding eye disease caused by diabet

New Way to Prevent Diabetes-Associated Blindness Found in Mice

May 26, 2015 11:19 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Reporting on their study with lab-grown human cells and mice, researchers say that blocking a second blood vessel growth protein, along with one that is already well-known, could offer a new way to treat and prevent a blinding eye disease caused by diabetes.

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Telomere Drug Target Slows Tumor Growth in Mice

May 26, 2015 8:30 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

Telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of chromosomes, may provide a new anti-cancer target, according to a new study using mice from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO). This drug target, effective so far only in lung cancer, may be effective in a variety of tumor types.

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How Do You Make an Elderly Worm Feel Young Again?

May 22, 2015 10:39 am | Videos | Comments

What controls aging? Biochemist Cynthia Kenyon has found a genetic mutation that can more than double the lifespan of a tiny worm, which points to how we might one day significantly extend human life.

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