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Q&A: A Lifelong Passion for Laboratory Animal Science

March 30, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

This week's Tales From the Lab is Julia Krout, CMAR, MLAS, RLATG, an Assistant Operations Manager at NYU Medical Center in New York, New York. She decided to enter the laboratory animal science field at a young age through a 'Take Your Daughter to Work Day.'

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The Environmental Protection Agency has said that it would provide $6 million in seed funds for a Predictive Toxicology Center at the University of Washington – one of three such facilities identified. It is intended to enable researchers to develop more

In Vitro Microfluidic Chips, Model for Chemical Testing

March 30, 2015 9:59 am | by Elizabeth Sharpe, University of Washington | News | Comments

The Environmental Protection Agency has said that it would provide $6 million in seed funds for a Predictive Toxicology Center at the University of Washington – one of three such facilities identified. It is intended to enable researchers to develop more accurate, higher capacity in vitro models – organ-mimicking cell cultures – to test chemicals' potential risk to humans.

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Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn’t. The findings are important to understanding human reasoning, especially in older adul

Rats Help Neuroscientists Uncovering How We Reason

March 30, 2015 9:45 am | by Cognitive Neuroscience Society | News | Comments

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn’t. The findings are important to understanding human reasoning, especially in older adults, as aging degrades the ability to maintain information about unobserved events.

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The intensive care unit is a last frontier for physical therapy: It's hard to exercise patients hooked to ventilators so they can breathe. Some hospitals do manage to help critically ill patients stand or walk despite being tethered to life support. Now r

Getting Patients on Their Feet Could Speed Recovery in ICU

March 30, 2015 9:23 am | by Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press | News | Comments

The intensive care unit is a last frontier for physical therapy: It's hard to exercise patients hooked to ventilators so they can breathe. Some hospitals do manage to help critically ill patients stand or walk despite being tethered to life support. Now research that put sick mice on tiny treadmills shows why even a little activity may help speed recovery. It's work that supports more mobility in the ICU.

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 An experimental therapy cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. The therapy was successfully tested in mice.

Nanoparticles Promote Wound Healing in Mice

March 30, 2015 8:59 am | by Albert Einstein College of Medicine | News | Comments

An experimental therapy cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. The therapy was successfully tested in mice.

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A new study raises the possibility that a high-fat diet produces changes in health and behavior, in part, by changing the mix of bacteria in the gut, also known as the gut microbiome.

High-Fat Diet Alters Behavior, Produces Brain Inflammation in Mice

March 30, 2015 8:59 am | by Elsevier | News | Comments

A new study raises the possibility that a high-fat diet produces changes in health and behavior, in part, by changing the mix of bacteria in the gut, also known as the gut microbiome.

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Honey bees use different sets of genes, regulated by two distinct mechanisms, to fight off viruses, bacteria and gut parasites, according to researchers. The findings may help scientists develop honey bee treatments that are tailored to specific types of

Honey Bees Use Multiple Genetic Pathways to Fight Infections

March 30, 2015 8:58 am | by Sara LaJeunesse, Pennsylvania State University | News | Comments

Honey bees use different sets of genes, regulated by two distinct mechanisms, to fight off viruses, bacteria and gut parasites, according to researchers. The findings may help scientists develop honey bee treatments that are tailored to specific types of infections.

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Sugar Molecule Helps Tell Cancerous From Noncancerous Cells in Mice

March 27, 2015 10:37 am | News | Comments

Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells.

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Stationary Neural & Cardiac Recording

March 27, 2015 9:31 am | Harvard Apparatus | Product Releases | Comments

Multi Channel Systems’ (MCS) Stationary ME system is a complete system solution for tethered in vivo / ex vivo neural and cardiac recording.

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Enhancing Environmental Enrichment Without Breaking the Bank

March 27, 2015 9:30 am | by Anastasia Schimmel, BS, RVT, RLATG and Renée Hlavka BS, RVT, RLATG | Articles | Comments

In recent years, more and more institutions have recognized the importance of environmental enrichment and behavioral management as part of the daily care for animals in research. Providing toys, activities, and socialization can have a significant impact on the quality of life for these animals.

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Gene Therapy Slows Vision Loss in Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

March 26, 2015 10:57 am | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Researchers have developed an antioxidant gene therapy that slows cone-cell death and prolongs vision in mouse models of retinal degeneration. The Harvard Medical School research team hopes the work will one day lead to new treatment options for people with inherited progressive blindness, such as retinitis pigmentosa, as well as other diseases involving oxidative damage.

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Nanorobotic Agents Pass Through Blood-brain Barrier in Animal Model

March 26, 2015 10:34 am | News | Comments

Magnetic nanoparticles can open the blood-brain barrier and deliver molecules directly to the brain, according to a new study. This barrier runs inside almost all vessels in the brain and protects it from elements circulating in the blood that may be toxic to the brain. The research is important as currently 98% of therapeutic molecules are also unable to cross the blood-brain barrier.

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Congenital Heart Disease in Mice Caused by Mutations in 61 Genes

March 26, 2015 10:18 am | News | Comments

Fetal ultrasound exams on more than 87,000 mice that were exposed to chemicals that can induce random gene mutations enabled developmental biologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine to identify mutations associated with congenital heart disease in 61 genes, many not previously known to cause the disease.

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Stem Cells Crucial to Cranial Development Identified

March 26, 2015 9:59 am | by John Hobbs, University of Southern California | News | Comments

University of Southern California researchers have discovered which stem cells are responsible for the growth of craniofacial bones in mice — a finding that could have a profound impact on the understanding and treatment of a birth defect that can lead to an array of physical and intellectual disabilities in humans.

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Got a Question About Cleaning and Sanitation?

March 26, 2015 9:44 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

Does sanitation stump you? Have a cleaning conundrum? Don't ask your co-worker, ask an expert! ALN is launching a new online-only column featuring an industry expert answering your burning questions about cleaning and sanitation.

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Majority Plan on Seeking Green Certification for Upcoming Renovations

March 26, 2015 9:43 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

The majority of respondents to an October 2014 ALN survey indicated that they were planning on seeking some sort of green certification for any upcoming renovations. Click here to see the rest of the results.

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