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Triggering "Virus Alert" in Immune System Combats Cancer in Mouse Model

September 2, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

Researchers have found a way to trigger a type of immune system "virus alert," according to a new study published in Cell. These findings could help boost cancer patients' response to immunotherapy drugs, which are designed to limit cancer cells' ability to avoid detection by the immune system.

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Gene Therapy Fully Restores Vision in Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

September 2, 2015 9:48 am | News | Comments

Mice lacking the protein retGC1, which is deficient in humans suffering Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1), a disorder that causes severe visual impairment beginning in infancy, received gene therapy to replace retGC1 and showed fully restored visual function that persisted for at least 6 months. The success of this approach strongly support clinical testing of a gene therapy targeted to the retinas of LCA1 patients.

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Gene Leads to Nearsightedness When Kids Read

September 2, 2015 9:39 am | Videos | Comments

Vision researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a gene that causes myopia, but only in people who spend a lot of time in childhood reading or doing other “nearwork.”

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A new study has now proven that blocking glycolysis - the molecular mechanism that makes it possible to extract energy from glucose - is especially damaging to the division of cancer cells and that specifically acting on this energy-based peculiarity coul

Attacking Bioenergetic Metabolism Improves Anti-Cancer Therapies

September 1, 2015 11:36 am | by CNIO | News | Comments

A new study has now proven that blocking glycolysis - the molecular mechanism that makes it possible to extract energy from glucose - is especially damaging to the division of cancer cells and that specifically acting on this energy-based peculiarity could be effective in treating cancer in combination with chemotherapeutic agents such as taxol.

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Multiple System Atrophy, a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson’s disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

New Type of Prion May Cause, Transmit Neurodegeneration

September 1, 2015 11:19 am | by Nicholas Weiler, UC San Francisco | News | Comments

Multiple System Atrophy, a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson’s disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. The findings suggest new approaches to developing treatments, but also raise a potential concern for clinicians or scientists who come in contact with MSA tissue.

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Working with mice, researchers have added to evidence that a commonly prescribed antidepressant called fluoxetine helps stroke victims improve movement and coordination, and possibly why.

Common Antidepressant Valuable for Recent Stroke Victims

September 1, 2015 11:06 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Working with mice, researchers have added to evidence that a commonly prescribed antidepressant called fluoxetine helps stroke victims improve movement and coordination, and possibly why.

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Research has revealed that epigenomic changes induced by pathogen infections, mediated by a transcription factor called ATF7, are the underlying mechanism of the memory of innate immunity.

Epigenomic Changes Key to Innate Immunological Memory in Mice

September 1, 2015 10:50 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Research has revealed that epigenomic changes induced by pathogen infections, mediated by a transcription factor called ATF7, are the underlying mechanism of the memory of innate immunity.

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By changing the mouse model they use to study how the immune system responds to cancer, a team of researchers hopes to shift the focus for one form of cancer immunotherapy back to the standard approach - relying on antigen-presenting dendritic cells - and

Different Mouse Model Turns Attention Away From Macrophage Approach

September 1, 2015 10:30 am | by University of Chicago Medical Center | News | Comments

By changing the mouse model they use to study how the immune system responds to cancer, a team of researchers hopes to shift the focus for one form of cancer immunotherapy back to the standard approach - relying on antigen-presenting dendritic cells - and away from the current upstart, macrophages.

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Innovive Inc, a leader in disposable IVC rodent caging, has announced that Stephen Baker has joined the company as Vice President of Business Development.

Pfizer's Stephen Baker Joins Innovive

September 1, 2015 10:12 am | by Innovive Inc | News | Comments

Innovive Inc, a leader in disposable IVC rodent caging, has announced that Stephen Baker has joined the company as Vice President of Business Development.

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Ergonomics is Not Just a Pretty Word

August 31, 2015 2:25 pm | by Cheryl Pater, BS, RVT, RLATG, CMAR | Articles | Comments

When most people hear the word ergonomics they think of chairs or computers; desks and keyboards; general office work. In reality, ergonomics has a role to play in the lab animal areas as well. Small choices, such as using the correct type of non-skid step stool to reach the top row of cages in an animal room, and large choices, like how to move 100 cages and accessories, can make a major difference in worker safety and comfort.

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It’s like something out of a science-fiction movie — time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans.

Mechanisms of Embryonic Wound Repair Identified in Fruit Flies

August 31, 2015 2:23 pm | by University of Toronto | News | Comments

It’s like something out of a science-fiction movie — time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans.

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When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still   make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye   called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cell

Eye Circuit Has Built-In Delay to See Small Moving Objects

August 31, 2015 2:11 pm | News | Comments

When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cells do their job, and may bring scientists closer to understanding how complex circuits are formed throughout the nervous system.

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Researchers have for the first time created and used a nanoscale vehicle made of DNA to   deliver a CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells in both cell culture and an animal   model.

DNA Delivers Gene-Editing Tool Into Cells

August 31, 2015 1:58 pm | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers have for the first time created and used a nanoscale vehicle made of DNA to deliver a CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells in both cell culture and an animal model.

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Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

Synthetic Tumor Environments Make Cancer Research More Realistic

August 31, 2015 1:44 pm | by Austin Keating, University of Illinois Urban-Champaign | News | Comments

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

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Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers.

Colorful Potatoes Suppress Cancer Growth in Mice

August 31, 2015 10:13 am | by Matt Swayne, Pennsylvania State University | News | Comments

Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers.

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Parkinson's Disease Brain Cells at Risk of Burnout, Like an Overheating Motor

August 28, 2015 10:34 am | News | Comments

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported.

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