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A number of therapies are available to help drug users quit, but addiction is extremely tough to beat. Scientists are working on vaccines to neutralize the high-inducing effects of recreational drugs, like cocaine. A new study has hit upon an approach tha

Vaccine Dulls Cocaine's Effects in Mice

January 28, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

A number of therapies are available to help drug users quit, but addiction is extremely tough to beat. Scientists are working on vaccines to neutralize the high-inducing effects of recreational drugs, like cocaine. A new study has hit upon an approach that might annul cocaine's additive buzz.

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What types of housing and housing equipment do you have in your facility?

January 28, 2015 11:16 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

ALN recently asked readers what kind of housing and housing equipment they use in your vivarium. Click here to see the results.                   

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John J. Sabine, Jr. passed away on October 18, 2014, at 60 years of age. He was born in 1953 in Canandaigua NY. He was raised in Morristown, N.J. and lived in Mendham, N.J. for the past 20 years.

In Memorium: John J. Sabine, Jr.

January 28, 2015 8:31 am | W. F. Fisher & Son | Articles | Comments

John J. Sabine, Jr. passed away on October 18, 2014, at 60 years of age. He was born in 1953 in Canandaigua NY. He was raised in Morristown, N.J. and lived in Mendham, N.J. for the past 20 years.         

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Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy t

Protein-based Therapy Shows Promise against Resistant Leukemia

January 28, 2015 8:27 am | by Children’s Hospital Los Angeles | News | Comments

Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy they believe will prove highly effective against drug-resistant leukemia cells.

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The Flexible Front Isolator Glove Box by Park Bioservices provides the highest level of biosecurity to the laboratory animal research community. It is also a solution for “germfree housing” of Gnotobiotic rodents.

Flexible Front Isolator Glove Box

January 28, 2015 8:25 am | Park Bioservices, LLC | Product Releases | Comments

The Flexible Front Isolator Glove Box by Park Bioservices provides the highest level of biosecurity to the laboratory animal research community. It is also a solution for “germfree housing” of Gnotobiotic rodents. 

Advances in PCR Improve Health of Animal Research Colonies

January 26, 2015 3:38 pm | by Ken Henderson | Charles River | Articles | Comments

Reducing the use of laboratory animals has been a long-term goal in biological research. Many in vivo assays, like rabbit endotoxin testing or mouse antibody production testing to detect viral contaminants have largely been replaced by in vitro enzyme or PCR-based assays.

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This week's Tales From the Lab is Karl Arend, Project Manager at Art's Way Scientific from Decorah, IA. Art's Way Scientific designs, manufactures, and installs custom facilities for laboratory animal research, biocontainment, triage, public health, and g

Q&A: Making Vivarium Spaces Flexible

January 26, 2015 11:32 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Articles | Comments

This week's Tales From the Lab is Karl Arend, Project Manager at Art's Way Scientific from Decorah, Iowa. Art's Way Scientific designs, manufactures, and installs custom facilities for laboratory animal research, biocontainment, triage, public health, and general laboratory requirements.

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Researchers Link Protein to Drug Allergies in Mice

January 26, 2015 11:29 am | by Brandon Levy | News | Comments

Immune cells known as mast cells play a primary role in allergic reactions. Mast cells are activated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and release inflammatory chemicals like histamine. Some compounds, however, can activate mast cells without interacting with IgE antibodies, triggering a so-called “pseudo-allergic” reaction. These substances, known as basic secretagogues, include many drugs that can cause allergic reactions.

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Telemetry Implants

January 26, 2015 11:15 am | by Data Sciences International | Data Sciences International | Product Releases | Comments

New telemetry implants expected to change how large animal toxicology studies are conducted. Data Sciences International (DSI) has released a new series of digital telemetry implants to meet the changing needs of preclinical toxicology researchers. M series, part of the PhysioTel™ Digital platform, was designed to help toxicologists collect physiologic data when incorporating functional endpoints into repeat-dose toxicology studies.

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Stress During Pregnancy Can Affect Fetal Development

January 26, 2015 11:11 am | News | Comments

Stress hormones in the mother can affect fetal development, according to a study published in The Journal of Physiology. Researchers found that increased levels of glucocorticoid stress hormones in pregnant mice caused the mother to eat more but reduced the ability of the placenta to transport glucose to her fetus.

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Fruit Flies Show How Sleep is Connected to Memory

January 26, 2015 10:43 am | by Leah Burrows | News | Comments

Scientists have long known that sleep, memory, and learning are deeply connected. Most animals, from flies to humans, have trouble remembering when sleep deprived, and studies have shown that sleep is critical in converting short-term into long-term memory, a process known as memory consolidation. But just how that process works has remained a mystery.

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The Molecular Biology Behind ALS

January 26, 2015 10:29 am | by Raymond Sanchez | News | Comments

ALS is notoriously difficult to treat, and relatively little is known about exactly how and why it occurs. In a rare discovery, a clear molecular defect has been found at the junctions between neurons and muscles, which may provide greater insight into the fundamental mechanisms of ALS, according to a new study.

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The "storm of the century" is about to hit the eastern seaboard, from New Jersey to Maine. In some areas, 3+" of snow and hurricane-force winds are predicted. In a press conference yesterday, New York Mayor, Bill deBlasio warned that this "may be the wors

Disaster Planning

January 26, 2015 9:04 am | by Stephen Durkee | Articles | Comments

The "storm of the century" is about to hit the eastern seaboard, from New Jersey to Maine. In some areas, 3+" of snow and hurricane-force winds are predicted. In a press conference yesterday, New York Mayor, Bill deBlasio warned that this "may be the worst snowstorm that New York has ever seen." ALN wants your facility to be prepared, so we're sharing this article on disaster planning from our archives.

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A study has shown that a modified form of the superabsorbent chemical used in disposable diapers can expand brain structures to four and a half times their original size. The process called expansion microscopy will allow scientists to take super-resoluti

Diaper Compound May Expand Power of Microscopes

January 26, 2015 8:52 am | by NIH | News | Comments

A study has shown that a modified form of the superabsorbent chemical used in disposable diapers can expand brain structures to four and a half times their original size. The process called expansion microscopy will allow scientists to take super-resolution pictures of healthy and diseased tissue throughout the body using common microscopes.

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Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer’s, but in a counterintuitive finding   reported, researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory   processes may trigger the disease.

Anti-inflammatory Protein Triggers Alzheimer's Plaque in Mice

January 26, 2015 8:27 am | by Morgan Sherburne, University of Florida Health | News | Comments

Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer’s, but in a counterintuitive finding reported, researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease.               

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Upending decades-old dogma, a team of scientists say enzymes long categorized as   promoting cancer are, in fact, tumor suppressors and that current clinical efforts   to develop inhibitor-based drugs should instead focus on restoring the enzymes’   activ

Enzymes Believed to Promote Cancer Actually Suppress Tumors

January 26, 2015 8:27 am | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Upending decades-old dogma, a team of scientists say enzymes long categorized as promoting cancer are, in fact, tumor suppressors and that current clinical efforts to develop inhibitor-based drugs should instead focus on restoring the enzymes’ activities.

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