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Noise-Deafened Mice Hear Again

October 22, 2014 | News | Comments

Scientists have restored hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies for humans. The research team shows the key role of protein called NT3 in ear-to-brain communication. These findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

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Protecting Us From Our Cells

October 22, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 boosts the body’s natural defense against this ‘friendly fire.’

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Focusing In on a Decades Old Mystery

October 21, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Elvis did it, Michael Jackson did it, and so do the mitochondria in our cells. They shake. While Elvis and Michael shook for decades before loud and appreciative audiences, mitochondrial oscillations have quietly bewildered scientists for more than 40 years. Now, an NIH team has imaged mitochondria for the first time oscillating in a live animal - in this case, the salivary glands of laboratory rats.

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Huntington's Study Halted Due to Rat Results

October 21, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

A biopharmaceutical company has suspended its Huntington's disease clinical trial as it further evaluates an observation from a nonclinical study in rats. Non-human primates exposed to plasma concentrations equal to those in the rat demonstrated no findings similar to the observation reported from the rat study.

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Antibiotics May Increase Spread of Salmonella

October 21, 2014 11:13 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University School of Medicine | News | Comments

Salmonella-infected mice that were given antibiotics became sicker and began shedding far more bacteria in their feces than they had before. But some “superspreader” mice remained healthy, unaffected by either the disease or the antibiotic. The study poses ominous questions about the widespread, routine use of sub-therapeutic doses of antibiotics in livestock.

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Medical Imaging Detects Early Cancer in Lab Mice

October 21, 2014 10:15 am | News | Comments

A new medical imaging method could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body. The researchers have demonstrated positive results in laboratory mice.

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Rat Study Helps to Understand Epilepsy, Other Brain Disorders

October 21, 2014 12:00 am | News | Comments

Researchers have used graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon only one atom thick, to fabricate a new type of microelectrode that solves a major problem for investigators looking to understand the intricate circuitry of the brain. The team performed calcium imaging of hippocampal slices in a rat model with both confocal and two-photon microscopy, while also conducting electrophysiological recordings.

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Therapeutic Saline May Treat Alzheimer's Disease, Other Dementias

October 20, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

Revalesio Corp. and Rush University Medical Center's Department of Neurological Sciences have published findings from two research studies that demonstrate the potential for RNS60 to treat Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia by protecting neuronal function, restoring neuronal connections and promoting neuronal plasticity.

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Drug May Offer Alternative to Chemo for Blood Cancer

October 20, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

Researchers say that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated quarter of the 500 U.S. adolescents and young adults diagnosed each year with this aggressive disease fail to respond to standard chemotherapy drugs that target cancer cells.

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Mature Human Intestinal Tissue Formed in Mice

October 20, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have successfully transplanted “organoids” of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice – creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. The findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.

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Male Mice More Likely to Become Obese

October 18, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research scientists and a team of international investigators found that the brains of male laboratory mice exposed to the same high-fat diet as their female counterparts developed brain inflammation and heart disease that were not seen in the females.

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Researchers Gain Control Over Stem Cell Differentiation in Mice

October 18, 2014 2:32 pm | by Debra Kain | News | Comments

Progenitor cells have the ability to differentiate into specific types of cells, and can migrate to the tissue where they are needed. Their potential to differentiate depends on their type and niche. The tissue-engineering technique discovered required only a simple polymer to deliver the cells, and multiple cellular groupings show the ability to generate a replacement organ with all cell layers and functions.

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In a discovery that might ring true even for some humans, researchers have shown that male brains – at least in nematodes – will suppress the ability to locate food in order to instead focus on finding a mate.

Male Worms Rewired to Prefer Food to Sex

October 17, 2014 1:11 pm | by Univ. of Rochester Medical Center | News | Comments

In a discovery that might ring true even for some humans, researchers have shown that male brains — at least in nematodes — will suppress the ability to locate food in order to instead focus on finding a mate.           

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FDA Issues Recommendations for Animal Drug Sponsors

October 17, 2014 12:48 pm | by FDA | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued today draft Guidance for Industry #227: Two-Phased Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) Technical Sections, with recommendations for ways animal drug sponsors can submit chemistry, manufacturing, and controls (CMC) data to the agency to improve the efficiency of the New Animal Drug Application (NADA) review process.

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection.

New Perspectives for Development of RSV Vaccine

October 17, 2014 12:38 pm | by VIB/Univ. of Gent | News | Comments

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection. 

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Researchers have found that male and female brains respond in remarkably   different ways to high-fat meals. Those differences in the brain lead to   greater inflammation and increased health risks in males that indulge on fatty foods in comparison to f

Brains of Male Mice Have Greater Response to Fat

October 17, 2014 12:26 pm | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Researchers have found that male and female brains respond in remarkably different ways to high-fat meals. Those differences in the brain lead to greater inflammation and increased health risks in males that indulge on fatty foods in comparison to females, a new study in mice shows. 

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