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Ergonomics is Not Just a Pretty Word

August 31, 2015 | by Cheryl Pater, BS, RVT, RLATG, CMAR | Articles | Comments

When most people hear the word ergonomics they think of chairs or computers; desks and keyboards; general office work. In reality, ergonomics has a role to play in the lab animal areas as well. Small choices, such as using the correct type of non-skid step stool to reach the top row of cages in an animal room, and large choices, like how to move 100 cages and accessories, can make a major difference in worker safety and comfort.

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A new study has now proven that blocking glycolysis - the molecular mechanism that makes it possible to extract energy from glucose - is especially damaging to the division of cancer cells and that specifically acting on this energy-based peculiarity coul

Attacking Bioenergetic Metabolism Improves Anti-Cancer Therapies

September 1, 2015 11:36 am | by CNIO | News | Comments

A new study has now proven that blocking glycolysis - the molecular mechanism that makes it possible to extract energy from glucose - is especially damaging to the division of cancer cells and that specifically acting on this energy-based peculiarity could be effective in treating cancer in combination with chemotherapeutic agents such as taxol.

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Multiple System Atrophy, a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson’s disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

New Type of Prion May Cause, Transmit Neurodegeneration

September 1, 2015 11:19 am | by Nicholas Weiler, UC San Francisco | News | Comments

Multiple System Atrophy, a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson’s disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. The findings suggest new approaches to developing treatments, but also raise a potential concern for clinicians or scientists who come in contact with MSA tissue.

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Innovive Inc, a leader in disposable IVC rodent caging, has announced that Stephen Baker has joined the company as Vice President of Business Development.

Pfizer's Stephen Baker Joins Innovive

September 1, 2015 10:12 am | by Innovive Inc | News | Comments

Innovive Inc, a leader in disposable IVC rodent caging, has announced that Stephen Baker has joined the company as Vice President of Business Development.

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It’s like something out of a science-fiction movie — time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans.

Mechanisms of Embryonic Wound Repair Identified in Fruit Flies

August 31, 2015 2:23 pm | by University of Toronto | News | Comments

It’s like something out of a science-fiction movie — time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans.

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When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still   make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye   called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cell

Eye Circuit Has Built-In Delay to See Small Moving Objects

August 31, 2015 2:11 pm | News | Comments

When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cells do their job, and may bring scientists closer to understanding how complex circuits are formed throughout the nervous system.

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Researchers have for the first time created and used a nanoscale vehicle made of DNA to   deliver a CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells in both cell culture and an animal   model.

DNA Delivers Gene-Editing Tool Into Cells

August 31, 2015 1:58 pm | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers have for the first time created and used a nanoscale vehicle made of DNA to deliver a CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells in both cell culture and an animal model.

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Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

Synthetic Tumor Environments Make Cancer Research More Realistic

August 31, 2015 1:44 pm | by Austin Keating, University of Illinois Urban-Champaign | News | Comments

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat – body tissues – but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior.

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Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers.

Colorful Potatoes Suppress Cancer Growth in Mice

August 31, 2015 10:13 am | by Matt Swayne, Pennsylvania State University | News | Comments

Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers.

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Parkinson's Disease Brain Cells at Risk of Burnout, Like an Overheating Motor

August 28, 2015 10:34 am | News | Comments

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported.

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Glial Cells Use Lipids to Direct Neuron Organization in the Spinal Cord

August 28, 2015 10:13 am | News | Comments

Healing spinal cord damage is an incredibly difficult problem because neurons have to be reconnected in a precise fashion, and there are still many mysteries surrounding how this occurs. Now, scientists at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered that in addition to proteins, lipids are also necessary for guiding axons.

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Taconic Biosciences Funds Custom Vici Syndrome Mouse Model Development and Breeding

August 28, 2015 10:00 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | Taconic Biosciences | News | Comments

Taconic Biociences has announced that it will fund the development and breeding of a custom mouse model to study Vici Syndrome. The company is donating the work as a Corporate Sponsor and Ultimate Technology Sponsor of the 2015 Rare Disease Science Challenge: Be HEARD. The winning project was submitted by Michael and Rachel Harris, whose 9 year old son David was diagnosed with Vici Syndrome in early 2015.

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Researchers Control Embryonic Stem Cells with Light

August 28, 2015 9:59 am | by Nicholas Weiler, University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue.

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Researchers Reveal How a Common Mutation Causes ALS

August 28, 2015 9:58 am | News | Comments

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases.

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Molecular Switch Controls Brain's Response to Vision Loss in Mice

August 28, 2015 9:53 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

A molecular on-off switch controls how a mouse's brain responds to vision loss, according to a new study from researchers at KU Leuven. This discovery may help improve the success rate of sensory prosthetics, such as cochlear implants or bionic eyes.

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Paralysis: Primates Recover Better Than Rodents

August 27, 2015 11:03 am | by Sarah Bourquenoud, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | News | Comments

Monkeys and humans exhibit greater motor recovery than rats after similar spinal cord injury, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine.

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