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Cost, Reliability, Durability Most Important When Selecting Surgical Equipment and Supplies for Use in the Vivarium

July 25, 2014 | by Elizabeth Doughman | Articles | Comments

Sixty-four percent of respondents said that they were responsible for performing surgical and medical procedures at their facility according to a May 2014 ALN World survey. A variety of surgical and medical supplies are used in the vivarium, and according to the survey, the most frequently used types are anaesthesia equipment, sterilisers, surgical equipment and supplies and surgical instrumentation.

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Scientists have found that some melanoma cells are particularly fast growing, but not very good at invading the surrounding tissue, while other melanoma cells are the opposite — highly invasive but slow-growing. In a tumor, the faster growing cells "piggy

Piggy-backing Cells Increase Skin Cancer Growth in Zebrafish

July 25, 2014 12:38 pm | by Manchester Cancer Research Centre | News | Comments

Scientists have found that some melanoma cells are particularly fast growing, but not very good at invading the surrounding tissue, while other melanoma cells are the opposite — highly invasive but slow-growing. In a tumor, the faster growing cells "piggy-back" along with the more invasive cells.

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Purified Water

July 25, 2014 8:16 am | ClearH2O | Product Releases | Comments

AquaPak® purified water for laboratory animals serves as an alternative to water bottles and works well as an emergency water source.

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Cardiovascular researchers at have successfully used a protein known as MG53 to treat acute and chronic lung cell injury. Additionally, application of this protein proved to prevent lung cell injury.

Protein Therapy Successful Treats Injured Lung Cells in Animal Model

July 24, 2014 2:18 pm | by Ohio State Univ. | News | Comments

Cardiovascular researchers have successfully used a protein known as MG53 to treat acute and chronic lung cell injury. Additionally, application of this protein proved to prevent lung cell injury.               

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Researchers have shown that in the fly Drosophila melanogaster the protein p53 is activated in certain cells to adapt the metabolic response to nutrient deprivation, thus having a global effect on the organism.

Molecule in Flies Adjusts Energy Use under Starvation Conditions

July 24, 2014 1:57 pm | by IRB Barcelona | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that in the fly Drosophila melanogaster the protein p53 is activated in certain cells to adapt the metabolic response to nutrient deprivation, thus having a global effect on the organism.           

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Cancer Drug Given Orally to Mice Improves Alzheimer's

July 24, 2014 1:36 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer’s disease. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer’s.       

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A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists at UC Irvine’s Reeve-Irvine Research Center have found.

Gene Inhibitor, Salmon Fibrin Restores Function Lost in Spinal Cord Injury

July 24, 2014 1:22 pm | by Univ. of California - Irvine | News | Comments

A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists have found.             

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Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most

Autistic Behaviors Linked to Enzyme in Mice

July 24, 2014 8:43 am | by Univ. of California, Riverside | News | Comments

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. Now, biomedical scientists shed light on the cause of autistic behaviors in FXS. 

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Self-contained Water Treatment and Delivery

July 24, 2014 8:21 am | Systems Engineering | Product Releases | Comments

The ReCIRC POD™, a modular self-contained water treatment and delivery system, features a 5.0 micron pre-filter, integrated RO unit, stainless steel re-circulating tank, UV sterilizing unit, and pump.

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A study reveals a novel pathway in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.   Researchers have identified the basic cellular mechanism that goes awry in prickle mutant flies, leading to the epilepsy-like seizures.

Genetic Link between Epilepsy and Neurodegenerative Disorders Seen in Mutant Flies

July 23, 2014 2:22 pm | by John Riehl, Univ. of Iowa | News | Comments

A study reveals a novel pathway in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Researchers have identified the basic cellular mechanism that goes awry in prickle mutant flies, leading to the epilepsy-like seizures.             

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The use of a virus designed to target and kill cancer cells alongside isolated limb perfusion chemotherapy — given directly to blood vessels supplying the affected arm or leg as an alternative to amputation — was more effective in rats than either treatme

Viral Therapy Boosts Limb-saving Cancer Treatment in Rats

July 23, 2014 2:03 pm | by The Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

The use of a virus designed to target and kill cancer cells alongside isolated limb perfusion chemotherapy — given directly to blood vessels supplying the affected arm or leg as an alternative to amputation — was more effective in rats than either treatment on its own.

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Researchers have developed a vaccine that can combat dust-mite allergies by naturally switching the body’s immune response.

Vaccine Reduces Dust-mite Allergies in Lab Animals

July 23, 2014 1:42 pm | by Richard Lewis, Univ. of Iowa | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a vaccine that can combat dust-mite allergies by naturally switching the body’s immune response. In animal tests, the nano-sized vaccine package lowered lung inflammation by 83 percent despite repeated exposure to the allergens.

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Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.

Therapeutic Bacteria Prevents Obesity in Mice

July 23, 2014 1:31 pm | by Vanderbilt Univ. | News | Comments

Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, investigators have discovered.                   

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Commissioning Verification and Validation

July 23, 2014 8:29 am | by Gilles Tremblay and Spencer Andrews | Articles | Comments

One of the most critical challenges facing today’s research facilities is the acquisition of regulatory compliance—that stamp of approval that defines an institution as highly qualified, safe and desirable for the demands and challenges of complex and highly technical research.

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Pre-filled Water Bottles

July 23, 2014 8:27 am | Innovive, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Aquavive® Pre-Filled Water Bottles for mouse and rat eliminate washing and processing steps from vivarium operations.

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A team of scientists has identified a key regulator of developmental timing. The researchers describe how LIN-42, a gene that is found in animals across the evolutionary tree, governs a broad range of events throughout development.

Gene Found in Worms Controls Timing of Events during Maturation

July 22, 2014 2:45 pm | by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory | News | Comments

A team of scientists has identified a key regulator of developmental timing. The researchers describe how LIN-42, a gene that is found in animals across the evolutionary tree, governs a broad range of events throughout development.     

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