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Blood Vessel Growth Not Essential to Spread of Lymph Node Metastases

July 2, 2015 | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

The growth of metastases in lymph nodes, the most common site of cancer spread, does not require new blood vessels, but instead takes advantage of existing blood vessels, according to a new study using mice from researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. This finding helps explain why the use of antiangiogenesis drugs that block the growth of new blood vessels has failed in clinical trials.

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Small RNAs Found to Play Important Roles in Memory Foundation

July 2, 2015 10:43 am | News | Comments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that a type of genetic material called “microRNA” plays surprisingly different roles in the formation of memory in animal models. In some cases, these RNAs increase memory, while others decrease it.

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How Your Brain Knows It's Summer

July 2, 2015 10:02 am | News | Comments

Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a key mechanism underlying how animals keep track of the seasons. The study shows how circadian clock machinery in the brain encodes seasonal changes in daylight duration through GABA activity along with changes in the amount of chloride located inside certain neurons.

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Study Finds Males May Contribute to Offspring's Mental Development Before Pregnancy

July 1, 2015 12:20 pm | News | Comments

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring’s brains starting before pregnancy.

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Sialic Acid: A Key to Unlocking Brain Disorders

July 1, 2015 10:56 am | News | Comments

A new report suggests that a common molecule found in higher animals, including humans, affects brain structure. The study, involving mice, shows that small changes in how sialic acid attaches to cell surfaces result in damaging effects on brain structure, poor motor skills, hyperactivity, and difficulty in learning.

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Cheek Muscles Hold Up Better Than Leg Muscles in Space

July 1, 2015 10:40 am | News | Comments

It is well known that muscles need resistance to maintain optimal health, and when they do not have this resistance, they deteriorate. A new report using mice, however, suggests that this might not be true for all muscles, offering hope that there may be ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for individuals in low-resistance environments, whether it be the microgravity of space, extended periods in a hospital bed, or behind a desk.

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Thermosensory Gene Responsible for Increased Activity During the Summer

July 1, 2015 10:13 am | News | Comments

The warm temperature on a summer’s day is often a time for relaxing, but researchers from the University of Leicester have suggested that a ‘thermosensory’ gene could be responsible for changes in behavior in different climates, based on research in fruit flies.

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Researchers Identify Two Promising Candidates to Prevent and Treat MERS

July 1, 2015 9:56 am | Videos | Comments

University of Maryland School of Medicine scientists and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., have discovered and validated two therapeutics that show early promise in preventing and treating the MERS virus, which can cause severe respiratory symptoms, and has a death rate of 40 percent. These therapeutics are the first to succeed in protecting and treating animal models of the disease.

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Marine Invertebrate Gives Clues to Tissue Regeneration

July 1, 2015 9:38 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

A common filter-feeding marine invertebrate found in coral reefs is able to eject and regenerate its gut within 12 days and rebuild it's branchial sac within 19 days, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. This finding could lead to promising new avenues in human soft tissue regeneration research.

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The influenza virus can be lethal to those who are infected. But what is often just as dangerous is the body’s own reaction to the virus. Now, a researcher has for the first time uncovered new details about how this response plays out.

Molecule Protects Mice from Dangerous Overreaction to Viral Attack

June 30, 2015 1:20 pm | by University of Maryland | News | Comments

The influenza virus can be lethal to those who are infected. But what is often just as dangerous is the body’s own reaction to the virus. Now, a researcher has for the first time uncovered new details about how this response plays out.

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Researchers have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another.

Understanding Why Animals are Healthy Offers Path to Precision Medicine

June 30, 2015 1:09 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another. 

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Research has revealed for the first time that pain is processed in male and female   mice using different cells.

Immune Cell Involved in Female Pain

June 30, 2015 1:00 pm | by McGill University | News | Comments

Research has revealed for the first time that pain is processed in male and female mice using different cells.

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Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome patients suffer symptoms including albinism, visual impairment, and slow blood clotting, but what makes some versions of the genetic condition fatal is that patients with some forms of the disease develop severe and progressive l

New Strategies Against Rare, Fatal Lung Syndrome Demonstrated in Mice

June 30, 2015 12:41 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome patients suffer symptoms including albinism, visual impairment, and slow blood clotting, but what makes some versions of the genetic condition fatal is that patients with some forms of the disease develop severe and progressive lung scarring. A new study explains what appears to be going wrong and demonstrates two possible therapeutic strategies in lab experiments.

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Laboratories that test chemicals for neurological toxicity could reduce their use of   laboratory mice and rats by replacing these animal models with tiny aquatic flatworms   known as freshwater planarians.

Flatworms Could Replace Mammals for Some Toxicology Tests

June 30, 2015 12:29 pm | by Kim McDonald, UC San Diego | News | Comments

Laboratories that test chemicals for neurological toxicity could reduce their use of laboratory mice and rats by replacing these animal models with tiny aquatic flatworms known as freshwater planarians.

Enzyme Fights Inflammation in Kidneys

June 30, 2015 8:23 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief | News | Comments

The enzyme IDO helps reduce inflammation in cells damaged by kidney disease in an animal model, according to a new study from Georgia Regents University. IDO also reduced inflammation in human kidney tissue.

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PRI-Bio has been selected by McCarthy/Mortenson and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to provide multiple bio-hazardous waste decontamination systems for the $835 million National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, a DHS Science and Technology Director

PRI-Bio to Provide Bio-Hazardous Waste Decontamination System for DHS Facility

June 29, 2015 1:43 pm | by PRI-Bio | News | Comments

PRI-Bio has been selected by McCarthy/Mortenson and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to provide multiple bio-hazardous waste decontamination systems for the $835 million National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, a DHS Science and Technology Directorate project located in Manhattan, Kansas.

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